Crusty Noses

A Dog’s nose is supposed to be smooth and moist, not dry and crusty. A crusty Dog nose can quickly go from bad to worse, drying out even more and forming crusty scabs that flake off and bleed.
It is a commonly cited fact that if your dog’s nose is points to sickness or allergies. But a dry nose does not always mean your Dog is sick.

Despite a long standing myth, a Dog’s nose does not need to be wet and cold in order for the Dog to be considered healthy. The key element to take note of is that if the skin on the nose is dry without any other signs or symptoms, this is nothing to be concerned about.  In a lot of cases it can occur when for example Dogs lick their own noses frequently, from weather and temperature changes or from rubbing their nose in blankets.

A dry Dog nose is uncomfortable for your Dog and it interferes with their ability to smell properly. A Dogs’ strongest sense is their sense of smell, in fact Dogs use their noses to analyze and understand the world around them. When Dogs can not smell as well this can cause them to become agitated or nervous. Even with Bulldogs who are not known for their sniffing abilities the sense of smell is  still crucial.

Possible Causes for a Dry Nose

► Weather, extreme heat or cold can contribute to a dry dog nose. Exposure to the sun can cause your dog’s nose to become sunburned

► Allergies to food, plastic water dishes or toys, household cleaning products, and pretty much anything else your dog develops sensitivity to.

► Dehydration

► Excessively licking their noses

►Underlying medical issues such as allergies, infections or skin disorders

Treatment

The nose of a dog is very sensitive this means you should never use human, chemical or perfumed products as a treatment.
The following products got several high recommendations by our Baggy Bulldog community members: Coconut Oil, Vaseline, Snout Soother, Argan Oil and Dog Nose Butter.

Applying ointment to your Dog’s nose can be a real challenge. Again the Dog’s nose is very sensitive and products like Coconut Oil are just too tasty to not lick off their nose. Here is the golden tip: After dinner and a short pause/nap, clean the Dog’s face and get ready to walk your Dog, put on your shoes and coat, put on the dog collar and leash. Right before you go outside, you apply the ointment to the nose and immediately go for a walk. This will give your Dog the distraction it needs to not lick or rub the ointment of and enough time for the ointment to absorb.

When the Dog’s nose is really dry try to apply it 3 to 4 times in a day with one application in the morning and the other at night. Once your dog is healed, you can make it a habit and apply ointment at least once a day to prevent nose dryness.

Scaling and crusts may be tempting to pick but this may not be a good idea. Dry crusts that are still stuck on may detach and cause bleeding and discomfort to your dog. It is however good practice to try and clean off your dog’s nose before applying ointment. This will help to remove any food debris that may be stuck on the crusts. Here is how to clean a crusty dog nose with warm water.

► Wet a soft wash cloth with clean warm (not hot) water
► Carefully wipe the nose without dislodging pieces of crust that are not ready to shed
► Apply ointment after every wash

Note that it is best to allow the crust to fall off by itself. Rubbing too hard will leave the skin raw and exposed risking the development of secondary infections.

Hope this blog helped you and your Dog. If you have any questions or know other good dry nose remedies, please leave a comment.

 

 


Related Blogs

Coconut Oil
Cleaning Wrinkles
Cleaning Teeth
All Bulldog Health Blogs

 

 

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ACL: Ruptured Anterior Cruciate Ligament

 

 

The Knee

The knee is a joint consists of three bones: The Femur bone (the long bone extending down from the hip), the  Tibia bone (the bone between the knee and ankle) and the Patella (the kneecap). These bones are joined together by a number of ligaments. Two ligaments crisscross in the joint from the femur to the tibia and are called cruciate ligaments. The one towards the front of the leg is called the anterior cruciate ligament and the one crossing behind it is the posterior cruciate ligament. These ligaments prevent the ends of the femur and tibia from moving back and forth across each other.

ACL Rupture

When the anterior cruciate ligament ruptures, the joint becomes unstable and the femur and tibia can move back and forth across each other. The anterior cruciate ligament is commonly torn when the dog twists on his hind leg. The twisting motion puts too much tension on the ligament and it tears. This often occurs if the dog slips on a slippery surface or makes a sudden turn while running. Obesity puts too much weight on the knee and overweight dogs tend to have more occurrences of ruptured cruciate ligaments. It appears that in most dogs with the problem, the ACL slowly degenerates and becomes weaker until it ruptures, without any sudden injury. Certain breeds appear to be at increased risk of ACL degeneration and include the Newfoundland, Labrador Retriever, Sint Bernard, Rottweiler and also the English Bulldog. Many dogs with a degenerating ACL will have the condition in both knees.

Symptoms

Dogs who have ruptured their cruciate ligament will appear suddenly lame, and usually hold the foot of the affected leg off the ground or only tip toe with the injured leg (the 2nd video in this blog shows a good example at 2 minutes and 39 seconds). In time, the dog may start to use the leg again, but often lameness returns. Dogs with a degenerating ACL may also show some pain and can have swelling on the inside aspect of the knee.

Diagnosis

The diagnosis of a ruptured cruciate ligament is made by a veterinarian through observing movement of the joint. The vet will place one hand around the femur and one around the tibia in a precise manner. By applying pressure on the knee, the veterinarian will feel the bones move abnormally in what is called a ‘drawer sign.’ If an animal is in a lot of pain, or very nervous, the muscles near the knee may be so tense that they prevent the drawer movement from occurring. If a veterinarian suspects a ruptured cruciate ligament in a dog but cannot elicit the drawer sign, the dog may be sedated to relax the muscles and then re-examined for the drawer sign.

Treatment

If the ligament is completely torn, your dog will need surgery. There are several different methods used to repair the knee joint when an anterior ligament is torn.

TPLO stands for Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy. Basically the TPLO surgery changes the bones of the knee joint to make them work in a different, more “level” manner. A portion of the tibia is cut, moved, and reattached to a different portion of the tibia using plates and screws. By changing the conformation of the tibia, the joint is stabilized. This is a technically difficult surgery but it has shown to produce excellent results, often with less arthritis. The recovery period is similar to that with the other surgical procedures.

TTA stands for Tibial Tuberosity Advancement, a procedure where the dog’s knee joint is manipulated to provide stability without the use of a functional Cranial Cruciate Ligament (or CCL). This is another surgery in which a different portion of the tibia is cut, and allowed to heal at a different angle to change the mechanical stresses on the joint. As with the TPLO, this surgery is more complex.

TTO stands for Triple Tibial Osteotomy, combines different aspects of the TPLO and TTA. Similar to the TPLO and TTA, the TTO involves cutting the tibial bone to change the angle of the knee joint.

Prognosis

If the dog’s exercise is restricted as instructed, and overweight dogs return to normal body weight, the prognosis is good.
Depending on the amount of injury to the knee and length of time between the injury and correction of the problem, degenerative joint disease may occur as the pet ages.

Most surgical techniques require two to four months of rehabilitation.  A second surgery may be required in 10 to 15 percent of cases, because of subsequent damage to the meniscus (a crescent-shaped cartilage located between the femur and tibia in the stifle). Regardless of surgical technique, the success rate generally is over 85 percent.

 

 

 

Reverse Sneezing

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Reverse sneezing (also called pharyngeal gag reflex, inspiratory paroxysmal respiration or mechanosensitive aspiration reflex) is a phenomenon observed in dogs, particularly in those with brachycephalic skulls. It is a fairly common in dogs. Its exact cause is unknown but may be due to nasal, pharyngeal, or sinus irritation (such as an allergy). With this condition, the dog rapidly pulls air into the nose, whereas in a ‘regular’ sneeze, the air is rapidly pushed out through the nose. The dog makes a snorting sound and seems to be trying to inhale while sneezing.

Is it dangerous?
Although it can be alarming to witness a dog having a reverse sneezing episode, it is not a harmful condition. The dog is completely normal before and after the episode.

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How to recognize Reverse Sneezing
In a regular sneeze, air is pushed out through the nose. In a reverse sneeze, air is pulled rapidly and noisily in through the nose. For some dogs, it’s a more or less normal event. Just as sneezing is a part of life, reverse sneezing is also a part of many dogs’ lives. The sound that accompanies reverse sneezing is kind of a sudden, startling sound that makes many dog owners think their pet is either choking or having an asthma attack.

A dog who is reverse sneezing typically stands still with his elbows spread apart, head extended or back, eyes bulging as he makes this loud snorting sound. The strange stance on top of the strange snorting sound is why many dogs end up getting rushed to the veterinarian or the emergency clinic by their panicked parents. Episodes of reverse sneezing can last from a few seconds to a minute or two. As soon as it passes, the dog breathes perfectly normally once again and behaves as if nothing happened.

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Cause
Reverse sneezing is caused by a spasm of the throat and soft palate. The spasm is triggered by an irritation to the throat, pharynx, or laryngeal area. The most common triggers are excitement, exercise intolerance, a collar that’s too tight, pulling on the leash, an environmental irritant like pollen, perfume, or even a household chemical or cleaner, room sprays, or even a sudden change in temperature. Rarely, there can be a respiratory infection or chronic post-nasal drip that causes the condition. Brachycephalic breeds, like pugs and Bulldogs, with elongated soft palates, occasionally suck the palate into the throat, which can also cause an episode of reverse sneezing.

Diagnose
Even though reverse sneezing is not dangerous to your dog it is important to rule at any other problems that might be causing this. The diagnosis is based on medical history and clinical signs. Try to make a video of the symptoms when going to your veterinarian and pay attention to when the reverse sneezing occurs. If you can figure out what’s triggering your pet’s reverse sneezing episodes, you can work to reduce or resolve the problem. Your veterinarian will rule out other causes of abnormal breathing and snorting, such as an upper respiratory tract infection, collapsing trachea, nasal tumors or polyps, foreign bodies in the nasal passages or mouth, and so forth. Occasionally your veterinarian will perform blood tests, allergy tests or radiographs to rule out other conditions that can cause similar symptoms.

Treatment
Most cases of reverse sneezing require no medical treatment. If your dog experiences a reverse sneezing episode, you may gently stroke the neck and try to calm the pet. Once the dog exhales through the nose, the attack is usually over. In certain cases, your veterinarian may choose to prescribe anti-inflammatory, anti-histamine or decongestant medications to help with your dog’s condition.

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When and why to the veterinarian?
If the reverse sneeze isn’t harmful why or when do I need to see the veterinarian? If your pet’s reverse sneezing becomes a chronic problem or episodes are becoming more frequent or longer in duration, I recommend to make an appointment with your vet to rule out things like a potential foreign body in the respiratory tract, nasal cancers, polyps or tumors, nasal mites, a collapsing trachea, kennel cough, or a respiratory infection.

If your pet is experiencing prolonged episodes of reverse sneezing, bloody or yellow discharge from the nose, or any other accompanying respiratory problems, it’s time to make an appointment with your veterinarian. Just as dogs sneeze intermittently throughout their lives, most dogs have at least a few reverse sneezing episodes during their lives as well. In the vast majority of cases, the episodes are temporary and intermittent, resolving on their own, and leave the dog with no aftereffects to be concerned about.

 

Some more video information about reverse sneezing

A video example of a Bulldog reverse sneezing

A sneeze on command

Bildertante Sylvia‎photo by Bildertante Sylvia‎

Read on more on Bulldog Health here

Neutering your Bulldog

Neutering means surgically preventing pets from reproducing. In males, the operation is called castration and in females it’s called spaying.

With castration both testicles are removed which takes away the main source of the male hormone testosterone.

With spaying, both the ovaries and the uterus are removed which means the female is unable to become pregnant.

It is a medical fact that in some cases spaying and castration can prolong the life of our pets and may reduce the number of certain health problems in later life.

Baggy Bulldogs

Medical benefits:

A female pet will live a longer, healthier life. Spaying helps prevent uterine infections and breast tumors, which are malignant or cancerous in about 50 percent of dogs.
Spaying your pet before her first heat offers the best protection from these diseases. Neutering greatly reduces the risk of them getting breast cancer, particularly if carried out before the first season, and infection of the womb (called pyometra). Both of these are seen quite often in older, unneutered dogs and they can be fatal.

Many unneutered female dogs have a false pregnancy after a season and, although this is natural, it can cause behavioural and even medical problems. Neutering your male companion prevents testicular cancer and several prostate problems.

Baggy BUlldogs

Behavioral benefits:

Your spayed female pet will not go into heat. Your male dog will be less likely to roam away from home. An intact male will do just about anything to find a mate, including finding creative ways escape from the house. Once he’s free to roam, he risks injury in traffic and fights with other male animals. Your neutered male may be better behaved.

Unneutered dogs are more likely to mark their territory by spraying strong smelling urine all over the house. Your dog might be less likely to mount other dogs, people and inanimate objects after he is neutered. Some aggression problems may be avoided by early neutering or can be reduced.


Disadvantages

As with any surgical procedure, immediate complications of neutering include the usual anesthetic and surgical complications. These risks are relatively low in routine neutering; however, they may be increased for some animals due to other pre-existing health factors. Spaying and castrating dogs may increase the risk of obesity if nutritional intake is not reduced to reflect the lower metabolic requirements of neutered animals.

Studies of cardiac tumors in dogs showed that there was a 5 times greater risk of hemangiosarcoma (cancer of blood vessel lining), one of the three most common cancers in dogs, in spayed females than intact females and a 2.4 times greater risk of hemangiosarcoma in castrated dogs as compared to intact males. Spaying and castrating is associated with an increase in urinary tract cancers in dogs, however the risk is still less than 1%. Neutered dogs of both sexes have a 27% to 38% increased risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations. However, the incidence of adverse reactions for neutered and intact dogs combined is only 0.32%. Neutered dogs have also been known to develop hormone-responsive alopecia (hair loss).

Specific to males
About 2% of castrated male dogs eventually develop prostate cancer, compared to less than 0.6% of intact males.
Neutering also has been associated with an increased likelihood of urethral sphincter incontinence in male dogs.

Specific to females
There is some weak evidence that spaying can increase the risk of urinary incontinence in dogs, especially when done before the age of three months.
Up till 12 months of age, the risk decreases as the age at spaying increases. Spayed female dogs are at an increased risk of hypothyroidism.


The operation


Castration

Baggy Bulldogs

The surgeon makes a small incision just in front (towards the pet’s head) of the scrotum (sac that contains the testicles).

Each testicle is removed separately, and the blood supply and vas deferens (spermatic cord) are ligated (tied off). The subcutaneous layers are sutured together with an absorbable thread, then the skin is closed with either skin staples, absorbable (hidden) sutures, or sutures that will be visible and need to be removed 10-14 days after surgery.

 


Spaying

Spaying a female dog is the surgical removal of a female dog’s internal reproductive structures including her ovaries, Fallopian tubes, uterine horns (the two long tubes of uterus where the fetal puppies develop and grow) and a section of her uterine body.

Basically, the parts of the female reproductive tract that get removed are those which are responsible for egg production, embryo and fetus development and the secretion of the major female reproductive hormones (oestrogen and progesterone being the main female reproductive hormones).

 

 

After Surgery Care

We strongly recommend to keep your pet confined in a crate or small room the night after surgery. This will give your dog the time to recover in a safe and quiet environment.

• Your pet may be groggy when you get home, experiencing a hang over from the anesthesia. Your pet will typically require 18-24 hours to recover from the general anesthesia. Most animals will be back to normal when the anesthesia leaves their system entirely

• Your pet may sleep much more than normal for 18-24 hours following surgery

• Your pet may be a little agitated or aggressive due to the after-effects of anesthesia. Avoid handling the animal too much as he/she might be uncomfortable and needs rest

• Isolate the animal from children and other pets. He or she maybe more prone to snapping or nipping at other pets or even children due to the after effects of anesthesia and if he or she is happy the dog might get to excited or playful in the company of other dogs which can cause problems for the stitches and the overall recovery.

• Your pet may have poor balance. This will make climbing stairs or getting in and out of the car more difficult than usual, so be ready to assist. Help your dog in and out of the car as sudden movements can damage his stitches. Lift the dog by wrapping your arms around the dog’s chest and back legs.

• Make sure your dog has a comfortable spot to sleep in a confined, secure, quiet place. Once they are settled, they are more likely to sleep it off and will be fine upon awakening.


Incision site

• There should be no drainage. A very small amount of redness/swelling at incision may occur.

• If animal allows, check incision site once daily for one week. Check for excessive redness, swelling, discharge, blood or if incision site is open.

• Do not clean or apply any topical ointment to the incision site. 

 


My opinion and experiences

The topic of neutering dogs is one that is always filled with a lot of heated discussions; should all male and female dogs be neutered? What is the right age to neuter a dog? Will there be changes to the dogs character or energy levels after the surgery?

A lot of questions come up. This is what I can tell from my own experiences. First of all I am an advocate to neuter all dogs, not only because of the overpopulation of dogs and the amount of dogs looking for a loving owner in shelters but even more so because of the medical benefits. Especially for the female dogs it can prevent a lot of fatal diseases and it will also have the practical effect that your dog will no longer be in heat (so no more troubles at the dog park with male dogs trying to mount her) and no more blood loss around the house or having to wear doggy diapers.

I do think it is best to wait till puberty and with females to do the procedure before her first heat cycle. With male dogs it can prevent unwanted behaviour like mounting or humping other dogs, marking outside or even inside the house and the loss of moisture.

Some people worry that their dog’s personality will change. In my experience this does not happen, you might see a fall in certain behaviour, but those are mostly the unwanted behaviours like roaming, mounting, fighting or spraying urine. People also worry that their pet will get fat. Neutered animals might have slightly lower food requirements so you just need to feed them a little less. Neutering your dog will have an effect on the production of hormones but it will not effect the dogs character or energy levels.

Make sure to find a vet that specializes in the Bulldog breed. Cause of their short noses the Bulldog requires specialized vet care when it comes to anesthetics. Talk to your vet and let him or her inform you about the surgery, the risks and benefits and make sure to prepare a safe and quiet recovery place at home.

Seasonal flank alopecia

Seasonal flank alopecia is when a dog loses hair in the flank area. It is a skin condition not a disease. Dog breeds that are most affected are Boxers, Airedales, Schnauzers and Bulldogs although numerous other breeds have been affected too.

The hair loss is generally confined to the flanks but can sometimes show on different places on their body. The skin typically is darkly pigmented in the areas of hair loss and can become dry and crusty. Usually the dogs will grow their hair back in two or three months. Sometimes the hair re-grows in a different color than the original hair and some dogs never re-grow their hair.

Baggy Bulldogs
At this time nobody knows with a 100% certainty why this occurs. Two of the most heard theories are that the cause is:

– a hormonal problem disrupting hair follicles
– related to vitamin D deficiency, lack of sunlight exposure

Baggy Bulldogs
In 95% of the cases this skin condition will not bother your dog, it does not hurt or become irritated or itchy. Sometimes the hair will fall out and can leave bald spots. The most common treatment is Melatonin, this can be helpful to induce hair growth and is given daily for two or three months until complete hair growth occurs. Restarting melatonin prior to anticipated onset of hair loss may prevent recurrence.

The prognosis for hair growth is unpredictable. Hair growth can be incomplete and new hairs may be different in color and texture.
There are a lot of home remedies like different kind of oils (fish, coconut), a special diet or sunbathing, but what works for one may not for another and the question will be if the treatments worked or that the condition healed over time.

The important thing to know that this is a cosmetic disorder which does not affect the dog’s quality of life.

 

Head Tremors

Baggy Bulldogs

Idiopathic head tremor is a condition that effects all dog breeds and is frequently seen in Labradors, Boxers and Bulldogs. Idiopathic means a disease that is of uncertain or unknown origin.  That means the exact cause of head tremors has yet to be determined. When a dog has idiopathic head tremors it will shake its head without having any control over it. No one really knows why this occurs, most dogs show symptoms of head bobbing (usually up and down but it can also be side to side).  In most cases the symptoms occur at the age from 6 months to 3 years.

Usually a typical idiopathic head tremor episode will generally last around three minutes. Once the head bobbing is over, your dog should return to normal, as if the tremors never occurred at all. If your dog does appear to have been affected, contact your local veterinarian immediately. This condition is totally unresponsive to seizure medications and the best way to handle an episode seems to be to focus the dog’s attention on a toy or treat. Episodes tend to get milder and less frequent with age.

Some examples so you know what the symptoms looks like:

 

Diagnosis

It is very important to let a veterinarian make an official diagnosis because the same symptoms occur in other diseases!
These symptoms may also occur with epilepsy, brain tumors or other neurological diseases. It will be important to have an experienced, reputable vet for this since some vets incorrectly diagnose head tremors as seizures and will put the dog on medication for the rest of it’s life. When your dog has these symptoms you can help the vet with his diagnosis by making a video of the head tremors and to make notes and log exactly when and for how long the head shaking occurs.

Officially there is no known cause but here is a list of possible causes/triggers supplied by our members who have dogs with idiopathic head tremors:

females during the heat cycle
from eating a particular food
from being given a particular supplement
after flea and/or tick treatment
after being given heartworm medication
after an intensive work out or from being stressed

Treatment

Again there is no medical treatment but here are some things you can do to help your dog through it. First of all make sure your dog is safe (remove sharp objects around him and make sure he doesn’t fall). Second of all be calm, if you panic your dog will sense it and panic too. Keep in mind that even though it looks bad your dog is not in any pain.  And third Distract your dog with a treat or toy try to keep the dogs attention. The current theory is that the tremors are a result of dysfunction of the proprioceptive fibers in the neck. Abnormal sensory input, causing alternating contraction and relaxation of muscle groups, may be responsible. This explanation, while almost impossible to prove, would explain why those affected stop shaking if something is done to focus their attention on an object such as a toy or treat.

Tricks
A lot of people give a little bit of honey or or other sugary treats (peanut butter, vanilla ice cream) allthough there is no medical proof this works so many of our members said it worked so it might be worth trying. Also gently massaging your dogs head and neck seemed to work for a lot of dogs.

 

 

More about Bulldog Head Tremors on Bulldogs World

 

Entropion and Ectropion

Ectropion and entropion in dogs are both conditions that can affect a dog’s eyelids. Dogs who have ectropion have eyelids that roll outward, where as dogs with entropion have eyelids that curve inward. Both are problematic for the cornea. With entropion, the lid rubs against the cornea, causing irritation. With ectropion, the cornea is exposed and can easily become irritated or infected.

Baggy Bulldogs

Causes
Both of these eye conditions are linked to genetic factors, and some breeds are predisposed. Entropion is common among Retrievers, Spaniels, Great Danes, many Terriers and Bulldogs. Ectropion is common among Basset Hounds, Retrievers, Spaniels, Bloodhounds and Bulldogs. Often, when the conditions are inherited, the symptoms are seen when dogs are a year or younger. Other causes include trauma to the eye. Entropion can occur as the result of other diseases, as well as genetic causes.


Symptoms

With both ectropion and entropion, you will notice that your dog’s eyes appear red and irritated. The main observable symptom will be the dog’s eyelids: if they curve inward, this is a symptom of entropion, and if they curve outward, this is a symptom of ectropion.

Other symptoms of ectropion include discharge, watery eyes, and conjunctivitis (pink eye). With entropion, some of the common symptoms are watery eyes, conjunctivitis and with both conditions the dog will result in rubbing at their eyes with their paws.

 

Treatment

Ectropion can often be managed with eye drops, which keep the eye moist, and ointments. In some severe cases, surgery may be helpful in correcting the problem.

Entropion is best treated with surgery. The surgery will remove part of the eyelid, tightening it so that it will fit properly, and not roll outward. One of the risks of this surgery is removing too much tissue, causing ectropion to develop. Often, the surgery will be done in two phases to prevent that outcome.

With both entropion and ectropion, the prognosis for the dog’s treatment is very good.

 

 

 

Bulldog Weight

A lot of dogs are overweight these days, putting them at risk of joint pain, diabetes, and shortened life spans. Several studies show that more than half of all pets are overweight or obese. The reasons for this obesisty is the same reason for obesity with people. An unhealthy diet and not enough excersise. Just as we’re eating larger portions and more snacks than a decade ago, so are our pets. Because our lives are busier, we’re less likely to get the exercise we need and less likely to take a long walk with our dogs. It might seem that an extra pound or two on our fourlegged companions isn’t so terrible. But that little bit can be a significant percentage of a pet’s total weight.

Some owners disregard the health hazards associated with overweight pets and instead focus on how cute their fat puppy looks. But overfeeding a fat dog is basically a form of cruelty. Overweight and obese pets not only have shorter life spans but also suffer from more medical problems during their lives, including back pain, arthritis, kidney disease, and diabetes, they’re also more expensive to care for as a result. Your dog can become stressed, depressed or agressive from an unhealthy lifestyle or diet. So it’s not only in the best interest for their physical health it is also very important for their mental health to get the right food and in combination with the right amount of excersise.


Bulldogs Weight

With Bulldogs I think this is even more important than with most other breeds. The Bulldog is a dog that might be hard to judge on weight cause of its unusual build. A lot of people think that Bulldogs are overweight when they are not. Some dogs are just build with broad chests will be labeled fat. But on the other hand there are a lot of Bulldog owners who love the natural chubbyness and wrinkles of the bulldog and by adding more pounds they think they are making their dog look better. Conclusion: You need to know the difference between muscle and fat and know that overweight dogs are not cute but unhealthy and unhappy.

How to Weigh your Dog

For puppies and small dogs you can use a kitchen scale.  To weigh your dog correctly, weigh yourself while holding your dog, then weigh yourself and substract your weight from the total. To check up on your dogs health it is best to regularly check your dogs weight. On average a Bulldogmen will weigh about 53-56 pounds (25-30kg)  and bitches  will weigh about 49-52 pounds (21-26kg). When your dog weighs more than the average it does not necessarily mean your dog is overweight.  If you have any doubt about your dogs weight contact your vet.

1 kg is ± 2.2 pounds

Read more on Dog Food and Dog Diets here:
https://baggybulldogs.wordpress.com/2012/07/05/dangerous-dog-food-and-food-tips

Dog Medication

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Luckily, most people understand that there are human medications, and there are dog medications. But the last few years more and more people think they are veterinarians themselves and think they can do without a vets visit. On the internet there are several Lists that are spread with titles as: Human Medication approved by Vets. I think this is a dangerous trend. It is true, even though there are not many, there are some human medications that work for dogs as well, but before you can give any medication you have to make a diagnosis and only a skilled veterinarian can do this. Do not think, that just because you got a lot of experience as a dogowner that this makes you a skilled Vet!

With the bad economy, people try to be inventive and try to diagnose their dogs by searching the internet and giving them human medications. Because of this a lot of Dogs get poisoned. In the US there was an estimate made that in a single year that about 100.000 pets were poisoned.

The Top 3 reasons of Pet Poisoning:
1. Medication for humans
2. Flee and Tick products
3. Human food

Even giving your dog baby aspirin, formerly thought of as safe, is not only harmful to your dog’s kidneys but studies show it has no effect on dog’s pain!
Only give your dog medication that is for dogs. Do Not give any pet medication from other species as well. Cat Medicine are totally different than dogs for instance.  Some of the human medications do work for dogs but only use them under vet supervision and recommendation. Always consult your vet before giving your dog any medication so you don’t risk overdosing or harming your own dog!

Some videos on Pet Poisoning:

Bulldog Farts

It can be hilarious and stinky…Bulldog Farts.  Bulldogs are quite the stinkers !

A lot of bully/molosser dogbreeds have this problem. Some say it is a digestive problem some say it is because of their short noses they take in more air when eating/drinking wich eventually comes out the other end as farts. The last option is from my own experience less likely cause i know a couple of breeds that fart just as much or more and dont have a short nose (great dane for example).

Allthough it can be quite funny, you don’t want to have to put on a gasmask at home cause of your bulldog so here some tips to prevent those bulldogbombs;-)

– Feed your dog with dogfood, dont give leftovers and stick to dogfood and dogcookies
– Let your bulldog eat and drink on a good level (like 20 cm’s from the ground)
– There are special anti-fart dogcookies on the market (yes I know funny, but its true)
– Put in some boiled rice with the dogfood daily or buy dogfood with rice in it
– I haven’t tried it but I heard canned green beans with rice together also works
– If your dog eats too fast and almost doesnt chew his food put in a tennisball in his food so he cant take it all in at once

If all the above fails….

Uhh….Good Luck..! 😀

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How to scrape the paint of the ceiling using your Bulldog

Luckily there are some Bulldogs seriously ANTI-FART 😀
Like this one…can’t stand the sounds of farts…hihi

Do you know any other fart preventing tips..or advice/videos etc?
Please post as a comment

Related Blogs:
Bulldog Food Tips
Dangerous Dog Foods
Bulldog Weight
Bulldog Health and Care
The Health of the English Bulldog Breed

A tip from Bulldogmom22:
The thing I’ve found works to keep fart at a minimum is yogurt in their kibble.
But it has to be given every meal and it takes a good month to see results.

Allergies

Skin Allergies are very common among dogs and they are very hard to treat. Some breeds have a genetic tendency to develop allergies, unfortunately the Bulldog is one of those breeds. 

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So, how do you know if your Dog is allergic and what is the best treatment?

The best way to treat a skin allergy, is to first find out what kind of allergy it is, before starting any treatment. Ask your veterinarian for an allergy test. This diagnostic test is an intradermal skin test, similar to the one performed on humans. There are several kinds of allergy test, none of the allergy test (blood or skin testing) is a 100% accurate but in most cases it will help target and treat the allergies better. In general the skin test is proven to be more accurate than the blood tests but it is also more expensive.

Allergy Testing

A lot of dogs don’t get tested for allergies but do get treatment from the vet with antibiotics, steroids or medicated skin washes. This will only treat the symptoms and not the cause! The best thing to do is get a full allergy test from the vet, this can be quite expensive but it’s worth it, it will eventually save you money and more important it will save your dog from any misdiagnosis or mistreatment.


Types of Allergies

Environmental and Seasonal Allergies

The most common of all the types of allergies.  This can be anything in the environment in- and outside the house, from grasses, pollens, molds and dust mites to cottons, wool, cleaning materials and so on. But it can also be an allergy to flea or tick medication or an allergy to the flea itself called flea bit dermatitis. Environmental allergies can be caused by inhaling a substance or through skin absorption. If we know what type of environmental allergy it is, we can either remove the object or irritant that causes the allergy, or if that’s not possible, treat the specific allergy and it’s symptoms.

In the case of some airborne allergens, your dog may benefit from allergy injections. These will help your dog develop resistance.

If your dog suddenly has an allergic reaction, be sure to check your dog’s environment:

  • Did you use a new type of laundry detergent, softener or cleaning materials?
  • Do you have a new rug or made any other changes in the home?
  • Did you wash your dog recently or gave him flea or tick treatment?

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Food Allergies

The most common Food allergies in Dogs are: grains, soy, corn, potatoes, wheat or a specific kind of meat or fish. Dogs with a food allergy will commonly have itchy skin, gastrointestinal problems like diarrhea or vomiting or even breathing difficulties. In most cases a well balanced high quality diet will cure all of the symptoms. However this might mean you will have to change your dog’s diet to fresh meat, home cooked meals or an all natural hypo-allergenic food which can be quite expensive.


Most common Allergy Symptoms

  • Itching and biting
  • Hives and Skin Bumps
  • Chronic Ear Infections
  • Stinking coat, paws or ears
  • Swollen or Running Eyes
  • Butt twirling
  • Interdigital Cysts (itchy red spots between the toes)
  • Hot Spots (wet and red spots on the skin)
  • Constant licking or Sneezing
  • Hair loss or crusts on the skin
  • Bacterial or yeast skin infections

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Treatments

Antibiotics
The kind of antibiotic medication used to treat your dog will be prescribed by your veterinarian after diagnosing and determining which type of organism is to blame
Antihistamines

Such as Benadryl, Zyrtec or Claritincan can be used, but may only benefit a small percentage of dogs with allergies. Always contact your vet first.
Steroids
A short term boost which gives the dog temporary relief. Long term usage of steroids may do your dog more harm than good.
Allergy Shots
In the case of some airborne allergens, your dog may benefit from allergy injections
Diet
In the case of food allergies a well balanced and high quality diet is a must

Prevention

Bathing
Bathing may help relieve itching and remove environmental allergens and pollens from your dog’s skin. Discuss with your vet what prescription shampoos are best. Beware bathing can also work counterproductive when fighting of certain infections so be sure to consult your vet before bathing a dog with skin problems/allergies.

Cloting
If your dog has allergies like grass put clothing and/or boots on them when going outside. If your dog won’t walk with boots make sure to clean their paws and bellies after a walk.

Housekeeping
Avoid using any cleaners or perfumes as possible, try natural cleaners on the floor and places they lay or visit often. Only use all natural, hypo allergenic detergents and softeners to wash your dog’s bed

Diet
As mentioned before a good diet is essential for a dog with allergies, not only for the ones with a food allergy. A highly nutritious, well balanced meal will support their immune system

Vitamins and Supplements
There are many kinds of dog supplements and vitamins available on the market; in pills, powders, drops, some especially for the skin or coat.

Probiotics
Probiotics are  micro organisms that can provide health benefits by adding beneficial bacteria to your dog’s digestive system. You can buy probiotics in pills, supplements, or you can give greek yogurt to your bulldog on a daily basis

Important: Always consult a veterinarian for a proper diagnosis before starting any treatment. A lot of Bulldogs with skin problems are treated for allergies and the other way around, so make sure to get a diagnosis and when in doubt don’t be afraid to ask for a second opinion. The internet, forums, fellow bulldog buddies can all be of great help, but I can not emphasize this enough, never rely solely on this, always ask for a medical opinion from a veterinarian before starting any treatment. 

Hotspot

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Hotspot
Is also called acute wet dermatitis.
Hot spots are common with dogs with long hair or a thick coat.

Causes 

It is usually caused by an allergic reaction to a specific antigen. Insect bites such as the flea bites are the most common cause found. But even small wounds in the neck caused by playing are mentioned. There are more possible causes of hotspot such as food allergies, mange, ear infections, poor grooming, shrubs or plants thorns, anal gland disorders, stress, hot weather and hormonal responses.
Hotspots are rare in colder months or in winter. They are equally common with dogs who live indoors and those living outside.

Treatment 

Although this is not a long-term disease. When hotspot occurs, the spot can disappear with treatment within a week. The hotspot could occur again that same summer, the next year or disappear completely.

You should treat the growth of the hotspot and address the original cause.
The area must first be cleaned with sterile water. Dab the area carefully and dry with a clean cloth. Keep the spot dry for a quicker result. There are different kinds of powders and ointments to dry out the hotspot. We must also prevent the dogs from traumatising the spot even further. You can give them a ‘lampshade’ or socks on the hind legs to prevent scratching. Sometimes it is handy to tape the big toe nail of the hind leg with tape like Leucoplast.

Many dogs that repeatedly suffer from hotspots could benefit from regular trimming (shaving) of the coat during the summer. Also a bath with special dog shampoo or defleaing your dog. Regularly cleaning their ears and anal glands can also be a method of prevention.

Appearance

Hotspots are circular spots, mostly on the head, the neck, the hip and on the side of the body. They are wet, raw, inflamed and usually bare and painful. Dogs usually lick or bite at the spot which causes further irritation. This is why hotspot is also called “Pyotraumatic Dermatitis” due to the fact that the trauma itself plays a major role in the development of the disease.
Hotspot can dramatically change in size in a very short period, what was the size of a quarter can become a spot of 10 cm in 6 hours time.
Always have your dog check by a vet before starting treatment.

Cherry Eye

A cherry eye is also called a third eyelid.

Cause
A cherry eye is not life threatening but can cause irritation and other medical problems such as inflamed nose wrinkles due to excessive teary eyes.
This way it becomes infected and causes injury to the eye.
The cause of cherry eyes is not yet determined with certainty. Some think due to the hereditary predisposition and the degree of folding in the face is a possible cause.

Appearance
If a dog has a cherry eye, you can see a pink lump in the corner of the dog’s eye. The size of the lump differs between 0,5 and 1,5 centimetres.

Treatment

Cherry eye can be treated in two different ways.

First people will first try using ointment massaging the third eyelid into place.
However sometimes this does not work or will only work temporarily. If so it is necessary for medical intervention.

Secondly, there are two ways of corrective surgery for cherry eyes.
The veterinarian can remove the entire third eyelid performing a small medical procedure with a local anesthetic.
The disadvantage of this method and that is that the eyes can dry out quicker causing damage to the cornea.
The other surgical procedure preserves the third eyelid. Here the lid is attached to the inside of the eye with several stitches.
This ensures the probability a shortage of tears does not occur.
The disadvantage of this method is that the dog needs to go undergo general anesthesia which is always a risk.
There is also a chance that the stitches tear making the third eyelid reappear. Repeating the operation is than the only option.

Before starting treatment always consult a veterinarian.

Dangerous Foods

As a responsible dogowner you should know what foods to avoid so you can prevent poisoning and keep your dog healthy.
If you suspect your dog has ingested a toxic food, seek veterinary attention immediately.



Here is a list of Foods use should avoid feeding your dog:

  • Chocolate & anything with caffeine especially dark chocolate contains theobromine which is similar to caffeine. This is a very dangerous substance to dogs. If you know that your dog has eaten chocolate take it to the vet immediately. If your dog eats a very small amount of chocolate, usually it only causes digestive issues. More on Chocolate Poisoning here.
  • Onions & Garlic contain sulfoxides and disulfides which damage red blood cells and cause anemia. Onions being the most toxic of the two, however garlic should be avoided as well.
  • Grapes and Raisins have a toxin that effects dogs kidney function and causes kidney damage and can lead to kidney failure.
  • Macadamia & Other nuts contain toxins that effect the digestive system, nervous system, and muscles.
  • Mushrooms effect many areas of a dogs body. They can cause shock and even possibly death.
  • Large Quantities of Liver results in Vitamin A toxisity and effects muscles and bones of the animal.
  • Human Vitamins Containing Iron damage dogs digestive system wall lining, kidneys, and liver. Be sure to use a vitamin supplement designed for dogs.
  • Milk & Other Dairy Products have lactose and many dogs don’t have enough lactose enzymes to effectively break it down. This effects the dogs digestive system and leads to diarrhea.
  • Raw Eggs contain an enzyme known as avidin which restricts the absorption of biotin one of the many B Vitamins. This can lead to an unhealthy coat and skin problems. Also eggs can carry salmonella which is poisonous to dogs.

  • People Food should be avoided at all times. Many people foods have far to many fats, sugars, and salt. Salt causes electrolite imballances in dogs. Sugars are not a natural food and causes obesity, and large amounts of fat and protein can’t be digested correctly and causes digestion problems as well as liver disfunction.


Now you know what not to feed your dog, here are some tips what you can give your dog for food or as a treat.

Vegetabull:D

Some people believe that dog food is dog food, and buy the cheapest brand available, because, well, their dog is doing just fine.
There are others that believe the most expensive brand is better because it costs more. In my opinion, neither of these people are correct.


To find a good dogfood ask your vet for advice. Also talk to other dogowners, check the internet, make sure you are well informed. Giving your dog the right dogfood, keeps their coat shiney, can avoid medical problems and allergies, can make a difference in the amount of poo your dog produces and most important keeps your dog in good health, condition and shape.

Also make sure your dogfood is produced on a humane and animal friendly way.
There are a lot of dogfoods that are produced in a horrible way.
As a dogowner you should be well informed before choosing a food for your dog.
You don’t want to find out you have been unknowingly supporting animal cruelty by feeding your dog.


Your dogs diet should be adjusted to his health, age, condition, weight and any  allergies or intolerances. If your dog is still a puppy or a pregnant dog you should adjust their diet aswell.

A small tip: if your dog eats to quickly (which can cause puking or gasses) try to put in a tennisball in the foodbowl, this way your dog has to push it aside everytime it takes a bite so it will eat slower and digest better. Always wait a while after their diner to go on a walk or let them play.

Here is someone who cooks diner for their dogs…look like a 5star restaurant for dogs!

Note: a lot of Bulldogs are overweight, yes a bulldog is a chubby and wrinkled by nature but a lot of dogowners think it looks cute when adding an extra few pounds.
In their eyes; the bigger and rounder the Bulldog the better. This makes it hard for your dog to keep in condition, is bad for their joints and their heart and shortens their life expectancy. I think a lot of good intentioned but lazy dogowners choose a Bulldog with the thought; well I chose a Bulldog so I can enjoy the company of a dog without the effort of walking it every day. This isn’t fair to your dog, a Bulldog not enjoys walks just as much as other dogs it needs it just aswell to keep them healthy. Even if your dog has a big yard to play in you still need to daily excersize and walk your dog. Make sure your dog gets the right amount of excercize aswell as a good diet, this will not only make it a Happy Dog it will also keep it a Healthy Dog.

Heatstrokes

Summertime is sunshine, play and happiness and what better way to enjoy the summer than with your dog?
Here is some info, tips and medical advice on how to keep your dog cool during summers and what to do when your dog is overheated.

It’s not only important for us to stay cool in summer, it’s just as important to keep our dogs cool, too. Dogs suffer the same problems humans do, like overheating, dehydration and sunburn. By taking some simple precautions, you and your dog can enjoy the summer months.

A dogs body is less efficient at cooling themselves than people, so they are more susceptible to overheating. A dog’s normal body temperature is 100-102 degrees. They have sweat glands on their nose and pads of their paws which they use to pant and drink water to cool down.

Heat exhaustion in dogs is often caused by dehydration and overheating from running or to much exercising during hot weather. Heatstroke can occur when your dog’s body temperature is too high for a prolonged period of time, and both can lead to brain and organ damage, heart failure and even death. Shortnosed, thickcoated breeds,puppies, seniors and dogs with health problems are especially susceptible.

How to keep your Dog cool:

1. always have fresh, cool water available for your dog, whether on a walk, in the car or in a tip-proof bowl in the house or yard

2. If you keep your dog outdoors, bring him inside during the hottest hours of the day,
and provide a shaded area in the yard, preferably in a well constructed doghouse,
making sure he always has access to cool water, since the hot sun can quickly make water too hot to drink.

3. Never leave your Dog in the car, not even for a few minutes

This is what happens when you leave your dog in the car. In loving memory of Thor who died an unnecessary death. Rest in peace, may your story help prevent other dogs from an unnecassary death due to unknowing and ignorant dogowners. Bulldogs and other short faced breeds are more susceptible to heatstrokes than other breeds. But NO dog or pet should ever be left in a car!

Thor’s Story on KCTV
Thor’s Story on WSPA

4. Protect your dog from sunburn. Many people don’t realize that dogs can get sunburn! It’s especially common in pale and short-haired dogs, usually on the bridge of the nose and tips of the ears as well as the belly, groin and insides of the legs (because of the sunlight that reflects up from the sidewalk and hot sand on the beach). Use a sunscreen (specifically for dogs) on rub it on your dog’s nose and ear tips. If you shave your dog’s coat in the summer, be aware that it will make him more prone to sunburn.

5. Dogs’ paws can get burned on sidewalks, asphalt and sand if walked during the hottest time of the day. You can check the temperature of the surface with your hand before walking your dog, if it’s too hot for your hand, it’s too hot for your dog’s paws. Walk during early morning or evening hours and never directly after a meal. If you must walk your dog during the afternoon, make it short and keep him on the grass or at the water’s edge when at the beach to protect his paws.

6. If your dog is more susceptible to the heat there are several products available at petstores like cooling spray and cooling collars and vests etc. I have tried and can recommend the cooling collar. I used it on my bulldog Twister (rip) who had troubles during walks on hot days and it really worked for her. Just put the collar in the freezer and put it on before you go on a walk.

7. If possible give them a small pool in the summer so they can walk in and out and take a quick cool down when needed. Small pools for children are handy for this purpose. When you have a real pool (deep water) never leave your dog alone by the pool, even when he is a good swimmer, a lot of dogs drown each year in peoples pools when left unattented.



Here is a video of my Bulldog James Hond 007 playing with Botox the Bulldog in the Yard. James just drinks from it and drops toys in it and than starts barking for me to get them out. Botox like jumping in and out and retrieving toys even under water; -)

Another Bulldog cooling himself down by taking a dip:

What to do, when your Dog is overheated?

  • Move the dog inside or into the shade
  • Give him water to drink
  • Make him wet, especially making their, paws, ears and chest wet will give a quick cooling down (use cool not cold water!)
  • Put a wet towel under and over the dog

If your dog has trouble breathing, purple or white gumbs or tung,
or is not responding to any treatment as mentioned above
it might be signs of heartfailure or a stroke, contact your veterinarian immediately.

Peaches the bulldog went for her usual daily walk and unlike the typical British weather, it was a very hot day. When her owners returned home with her, peaches suddenly collapsed and had major difficulties breathing. She was rushed into Vet’s Klinic with suspected heatstroke.


Don’t Cook your Dog in a Car

Do you have more tips on how to keep your dog cool in the summer?
Please comment 

CPR

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, or CPR, is a combination of chest compression and artificial respiration. It is normally used when you cannot feel or hear the dog’s heart beat. Once the dog stops breathing the heart will go into cardiac arrest and cease beating. Before performing this procedure please keep in mind that Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation is hazardous and can cause physical complications or fatal damage if performed on a healthy dog. It should only be performed when necessary.

Artificial Respiration

Step 1
Check your dog’s vital signs. Talk to and rub your dog to see if he/she responds. If he/she offers no response, CPR will be helpful where:
Your dog has fallen unconscious and has stopped breathing; and/or Has no heartbeat (see how to locate the pulse point below).

Step 2
Contact emergency help immediately. Call your own vet, or an emergency vet or animal hospital and let them know you’re coming. Get someone else to drive while you perform the following procedures.

Step 3
Lay the dog on the right side and check the pulse point. Laying your dog on his/her right means that his/her heart is facing up.
Bring the left leg elbow back to the chest – the point where the elbow meets the chest will be the third to fifth chest space, where the heart is located. This is a pulse point but if your dog is large or obese, it might not be the most ideal pulse point. If you cannot find the heart pulse point, look for the pulse point on the wrist. Run your finger along the dewclaw pad (front or back foot) and you should feel a pulse.

Step 4
Clear the airway. Remove any vomit, blood, mucus, foreign material from your dog’s mouth. Pull the dog’s tongue forward. Align the head with the back and tilt it back a little; this will help to open the airway. Hold one hand under the lower jaw to close it. Place the thumb of the same hand on top of the nose the hold the mouth shut. Alternately you can cup both your hands around the mouth (and lips for a large dog). The important thing is that you don’t want the air to escape through the mouth. Small dog, place your mouth over the dog’s nose and mouth and blow 4-5 quick breaths.
Large dog, place your mouth over the dog’s nostrils and blow 4-5 quick breaths. Watch for the gentle rise of the chest.

Step 5
Wait 2-3 seconds. This allows the air to exhale. Continue breathing in and pausing until normal breathing returns. Be aware that this can take as long as an hour. Continue until the vet is able to insert an oxygen tube into the dog’s airway to provide mechanical ventilation.

Step 6
If your dog’s heartbeat has stopped, perform cardiac massage in alternation with with the artificial respiration.

Compression

Step 1
Place your hand on his/her chest behind her front leg “elbow”

Step 2
Lock your fingers together and lock your elbows.

Step 3
Press down gently but firmly. Press 15 times in 10 seconds

Step 4
Return to artificial respiration. However, if you need to perform cardiac massage as well as artificial respiration, it should be 15 compressions to one breath.

Step 5
Add an abdominal squeeze. Slip your left hand under the abdomen and use your right hand to “squeeze”. The purpose of this movement is to assist recirculation of blood to the heart.

Step 6
Continue alternating. Perform 15 compressions, one breath, and a squeeze.  If two rescuers are available, alternate the compression and the squeeze, one person taking compression and the other the squeeze.


Dog Paws

Walking the dogs in the Snowy weather is fun but  ice and snow can cause damage to your dog’s paws. Snow and ice can get stuck in between the pads on your dog’s paws, causing cuts and uncomfortably cold toes. Even a small amount of build-up under your dog’s feet can pull the sensitive hairs underneath and cause a noticable loss of traction. In addition, rock salt, anti-freeze and other sidewalk treatments can leave your dog with painful, sore feet. During the winter, you’ll need to take extra steps to prevent problems like cuts, infections, sores and painful paws.

bbWhen you’re just coming in from a snowy walk and wonder how to free your dog’s feet from caked snow, the best way is to simply let it melt off in the heat of your home. You can dry of your dog with a towel and clean your dog’s paws with a babywipe, give special attention to the areas between the toes. If salt is stuck in the fur or ice between the pads don not try to pull it of this will be hurtful for the dog, try to soak the paws in some water and try again with some tissue or babywipes. To prevent these painful paws you could also consider dogboots, especially when you live in a climate with regular snowfall this is adviced. Dogs will have to get used to wearing dogboots/dogshoes but it can be a prevention and solution for problems with snow or in summer with hot pavements. Some funny video examples here: Bulldogs in Boots

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Instructions on how to Care for your Dog’s Paws:

  • Wash the paws with slightly warm water after going for a walk. You want to wash off harmful irritants like salt and prevent your dog from ingesting any of the chemical de-icers by licking their feet. This also eliminates any ice or snow that has built up between your dog’s toes that could make walking painful.
  • Inspect your dog’s paws after every walk, particularly when you’ve walked in areas treated with salts or other sidewalk treatments. Be sure to check between the toes and look at the pad for any cracks or sore spots.
  • Cut your dog’s nails and trim the hair on his feet regularly. Hair that is too long attracts snow and slush which can cause problems. Keep from cutting the fur too short, however, as it offers protection for your dog’s feet.
  • Apply some oil to your dog’s paws to help sooth irritated feet. Be careful not to apply too much or too often as pads that are too soft can also lead to irritation. You can also apply just before going outside as it can help protect your dog’s feet but take it off when you get back inside. Pet stores also sell special wax or other products that work the same way.
  • Purchase dog boots for your pet if you live in an area that gets a lot of snow and cold or if your dog is susceptible to problem paws. The boots fit over your dog’s paws and offer warmth and comfort. You may want to look for some that have added traction on the bottom so that you’re dog has an easier time walking on the snow and ice.
  • Treat any cuts, sores or infections that develop according to your vet’s instructions. If you notice that your dog seems to have painful feet even without sores, take a day or two off from walking in the snow.

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Special thanks to Jane Morgan for her input.

Dog Bathing

Bathing your bulldog, can be a difficult job.
Unfortunately not all dogs go in as easy as this one..


Here are 10 Tips to give your Bulldog a Bath:

1. Collect the materials you will need, so you will have everything close at hand.
Materials: Doggyshampoo, brush or sponge, treats, towels, cotton balls (for cleaning the ears).

2. Before you giving your dog a bath, give his coat a good brushing This will remove any loose dirt, mats and snarls. Tangles in your dog’s coat will be much harder to remove once his coat is wet.

3.  Make sure your dog doesn’t slip in the tub or shower, put a towel on the floor when you think he might slip

4. The whole bathing process may be somewhat frightening, so take things slowly. Help your dog to associate the tub or sink with pleasant things by speaking in a soothing voice and giving him treats. Be ready to put lots of effort into making the bath a positive experience for your dog; doing so will pay off in the long run if your pet is a happy participant, rather than frightened or resistant. Make sure the first time the water isn’t to high (chestlevel) so he can get used to it.

5. If you want to stay a little dry when bathing your dog, begin washing from behind and save the neck and head for last. Usually they start shaking when their neck and head gets wet.

6. Examine your dog carefully for skin irritations, fleas and ticks, ear infections, or other health concerns. You can detect fleas with a special brush and ticks can be seen as small lumbs.

7. When washing make sure to take special care of the ears, wrinkles, tail, genitals and between the toes.

8. Rinse all of the shampoo out of your dog’s coat thoroughly. If you can still see bubbles on the dog, you need to rinse a couple more times. Any soap, shampoo or conditioner residue left on the dog will attract dirt, defeating the purpose of the exercise. Soap residue can also irritate your dog and cause itching.

9. Dry your dog with the towel, when bathing your dog in a tub, let the water run out and dry your dog in the tub (this will save you a lot of cleaning afterwards) .When the dog is dried up, brush it again, this will remove the last hairs and will make their coat shine

10. Give him a tasty treat as a reward for good behavior. He’ll quickly learn that getting a bath is not a frightening experience. Don’t be surprised if your dog wants to run around the house like a puppy, rubbing himself on everything to try and dry himself. This is normal behavior but if he is getting himself dirty, then distract him with toys or a game.

Important:

Avoid getting water or shampoo in your dog’s ears and eyes. A small piece of cotton ball can be gently tucked into each ear to stop water or shampoo going into the inner ear but be careful not to push this in too far. If in doubt, leave this out.

Always use dogshampoo from your vet or petstore. Don’t use human shampoo even when it is organic or PH neutral. Quality pet shampoos take into consideration that a dog’s skin has a different pH level than human skin.

Don’t wash your dog to often. In most cases a brush will get out most of the dirt. Washing your dog to often can lead to skinproblems.

Don’t wash your puppy the first few weeks, when they are young they are much more likely to get a cold from it.

Some more Bathing Bulldog Cuteness ♥

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Daily Care

 

The coat of an English Bulldog requires minimal care. Regular brushing is sufficient. However, the wrinkles/folds of the bulldogs face needs to be monitored regularly. The places where the skin overlaps can get infected. There are special lotions and creams available to treat these kinds of skin infections. There are various methods and remedies for cleaning the skin folds. I use baby wipes for cleaning the wrinkles. And for a more thorough cleaning I use Sudocrem. My experience is that most bulldogs need a weekly brushing and cleaning.

When giving a bulldog their bath it is important that to wash with dog shampoo. Shampoo for humans often contains substances that are harmful for the skin of the dog.


For more information on bathing your Bulldog read the following:
https://baggybulldogs.wordpress.com/2012/06/30/bulldog-bath

The nails of the dog should be regularly monitored. Check to see if the nails are not too long and take extra care of the big toe nail. The nails can be cut with a special cutter for dog nails. Make sure when you do cut their nails you do not cut them too short. If you can’t do it yourself your vet can help with this.


Ensure the ears of the dogs are regularly cleaned. I do this with baby wipes and for a thorough cleaning I use foam lotion. There are several types of medicines and lotions available to clean dog ears at pet stores or at your veterinarian.

Many people confuse fat with muscle and with this thought make their bulldogs unhealthy. When bulldogs are overweight, the load is too heavy for their joints and their heart must work much harder when exercising. This is similar to people with an unhealthy fitness.

The English Bulldog is strongly built and naturally a fit dog. The normal weight of a male is between 25 and 30 kilograms and for a female between 20 and 25 kilograms. If your bulldog is above or below this weight it is not immediately too heavy or too thin. Each bulldog, like every human, is different in terms of construction and bones. If you are unsure about the weight of your dog consult your veterinarian.

The English Bulldog breed has some breed specific health problems. The bulldog is prone to allergies and skin problems. And certain genetic abnormalities occur like shortness of breath, joint problems or cherry eyes. It is important that bulldog breeders take responsibility breeding healthy bulldogs and owners give them the proper medical care when needed.

It is important to mention that the Internet is useful information supply.
Beware: Never act on an internet diagnosis and always consult an expert or veterinarian.

Cleaning Wrinkles

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The English Bulldog is known for his unique face, a flat nose and wrinkly face. These adorable characteristics gives the Bulldog his unique appareance. But unfortunately these cute wrinkles can get moisture in them. This causes the skin to get irritated and when not treated it will get infected.  The area will become messy, dark and moist. Also the infected area will stink, which can really effect your cuddle time. To prevent this you have to clean these wrinkles.  How often you clean them depends on the dog. Some do very well if you clean the wrinkles only once a month. Some need it on a daily basis. Here are some tips on how to clean those wrinkles and what type of products to use.

Supplies Needed for Cleaning your English bulldog:

• Cotton balls or dry dog/baby wipes

• Sterile Eye Wash available at pet or drug stores

• Vaseline for the nose

• Dry towels

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Instructions Bulldog Wrinkle Cleaning

1. Clean your Bulldog’s wrinkles and skin folds with a cleansing wipe designed for dogs. Make sure the brand you use is soap-free and safe for animals

2. Make sure the eye and nose area is completly clean

3. When you dry cleaned the wrinkles, wash his nose and apply a good rub of Vaseline to keep it soft

4. Give your Bulldog a shower or bath using a hypoallergenic, soap-free cleanser. Pay special attention to those bulldog’s skin folds and wrinkles, rub your soapy fingers into the wrinkles, making sure to avoid the dog’s eyes.

5. Rinse your dog thoroughly to make sure that all soap and dirt are washed out from his wrinkles, then dry your dog with a towel. Make sure the skin folds are dry, trapped moisture can become a breeding ground for bacteria.

6. There are a lot of different products available, from shampoos to creams, sprays and tissues at the petstores,  if you are unsure which products to use, consult your veterinarian.

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Read more on Bulldog Health:
https://baggybulldogs.wordpress.com/category/bulldog-health

Dental Care

Dogs need dental care! Unfortunately, dental hygiene for dogs is sometimes overlooked. Many people seem to just expect dogs to have bad breath, and few people brush their dog’s teeth frequently or do not brush at all. Dental hygiene is just as important to your dog’s overall health as things like nutrition or proper exercise. Help keep your dog healthy and pay attention to those pearly whites!

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1. The Breath Test
Sniff your dog’s breath. Not a field of lilies? That’s okay, a normal doggy breath isn’t particularly fresh smelling. However, if his breath is especially offensive and is accompanied by smell or iron (blood), a loss of appetite, vomiting or excessive drinking or urinating, it’s a good idea to take your dog to the vet.

2. Check the Mouth 
Once a week, with your dog facing you, lift his lips and examine his gums and teeth. The gums should be pink, not white or red, and should show no signs of swelling. His teeth should be clean, without any brownish tartar.

3. Signs of Oral Disease
The following are signs that your dog may have a problem in his mouth or gastrointestinal system and should be checked by a veterinarian: Bad breath, excessive drooling, inflamed gums, tumors in the gums, cysts under the tongue or loose teeth

4. Tooth Decay
Bacteria and plaque-forming foods can cause build-up on a dog’s teeth. This can harden into tartar, possibly causing gingivitis, receding gums and tooth loss. Only way to prevent this is by regular teeth cleanings.

5. Canine Tooth Brushing Kit
Get yourself a toothbrush made especially for canines or a clean piece of soft gauze to wrap around your finger. Ask your vet for a toothpaste made especially for canines or make a paste out of baking soda and water. Never use human tooth paste with dogs. Special mouthwash for dogs is also available at the vets or petshops.

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6. How to start brushing
Taking these steps will make brushing a lot easier for the both of you:
First get your dog used to the idea of having her teeth brushed. Massage her lips with your finger in a circular motion for 30 to 60 seconds once or twice a day for a few weeks. Then move on to her teeth and gums.
When your pooch seems comfortable being touched this way, put a little bit of dogtoothpaste or a paste of baking soda and water on her lips to get her used to the taste. Next, introduce a toothbrush designed especially for dogs. Toothbrushes that you can wear over your finger (or a clean piece of gauze) are also available and allow you to give a nice massage to your dog’s gums (see video).

7. Brushing Technique
Yes, there is actually a technique! Place the brush or your gauze-wrapped finger at a 45-degree angle to the teeth and clean in small, circular motions. Work on one area of your dog’s mouth at a time, lifting her lip as necessary. The side of the tooth that touches the cheek usually has the most tartar, and giving a final downward stroke can help to remove it. Once you get the technique down, repeat this once or twice a week. When you give raw foods you will have to do this more often if not every day.


8.Mouth Disorders

Getting familiar with the possible mouth problems your dog may encounter will help you determine when it’s time to see a vet about treatment, the most common dental problems are:

Periodontal disease
This is a painful infection between the tooth and the gum that can result in tooth loss and spread infection to the rest of the body. Signs are loose teeth, bad breath, tooth pain, sneezing and nasal discharge. This can cause infection of the heart valves (endocarditis), liver, and kidneys.

Gingivitis
An inflammation of the gums caused mainly by accumulation of plaque, tartar and bacteria above and below the gum line. Signs include bleeding, red, swollen gums and bad breath. It is reversible with regular teeth cleanings.

Halitosis
Bad breath, can be the first sign of a mouth problem and is caused by bacteria growing from food particles caught between the teeth or by gum infection. Regular tooth-brushings are a great solution.

Swollen gums
D
evelop when tartar builds up and food gets stuck between the teeth. Regularly brushing your dog’s teeth at home and getting annual cleanings at the vet can prevent tartar and gingivitis.

Proliferating gum disease
O
ccurs when the gum grows over the teeth and must be treated to avoid gum infection. An inherited condition common to boxers and bull terriers, it can be treated with antibiotics.

Mouth tumors
Appear as lumps in the gums. Some are malignant and must be surgically removed.

Salivary cysts
Look like large, fluid-filled blisters under the tongue, but can also develop near the corners of the jaw. They require drainage, and the damaged saliva gland must be removed.

Canine distemper teeth
Can occur if a dog had distemper as a puppy. Adult teeth can appear looking eroded and can often decay. As damage is permanent, decayed teeth should be removed by a vet.

9. Chewing Toys
Chew toys can satisfy your dog’s natural desire to chomp, while making his teeth strong. Gnawing on a chew toy can also help massage his gums and help keep his teeth clean by scraping away soft tartar. Ask your vet to recommend toxin free nylon and rubber chew toys. Gnawing also reduces your dog’s overall stress level, prevents boredom and gives him an appropriate outlet for his natural need to chew.

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10. Diet for Healthy Teeth
Ask your vet about a specially formulated dry food that can slow down the formation of plaque and tartar. Also, avoid feeding your dog table scraps, instead giving him treats that are specially formulated to keep canine teeth healthy.

Dental Cleaning by Your Veterinarian: 

To prevent dental disease, your dog needs routine dental care at home. But to perform good home care, you need to start with clean teeth. Brushing will remove plaque but not tartar. So if your dog’s teeth have tartar, it is necessary for your veterinarian to remove it and polish the teeth. This professional veterinary dental cleaning is often called a prophylaxis or “prophy.”

A routine dental cleaning consists of:

  • Anesthetizing your dog.
  • Taking radiographs (x-rays) to assess the health of all of the teeth and bones of the mouth.
  • Flushing the mouth with a solution to kill the bacteria.
  • Cleaning the teeth with handheld and ultrasonic scalers. All calculus is removed from above and below the gumline. This is extremely important and can only be done if the animal is under anesthesia.
  • Using a disclosing solution to show any areas of remaining calculus which are then removed.
  • Polishing the teeth to remove microscopic scratches.
  • Inspecting each tooth and the gum around it for any signs of disease.
  • Flushing the mouth, again, with an antibacterial solution.
  • Optionally, applying a dental agent to retard plaque build up.
  • Recording any abnormalities or additional procedures on a dental chart.
  • Determining the best follow-up and home dental care program for your dog.
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Very important for Bulldogowners: 
Most Bulldogs can not tolerate certain methods of anesthesia, due to their flat faces they need more monitoring and need special sedation procedures (like having the dog tubed all times). Always ask your vet about this! It happens to often that a Bulldog dies because of wrong anesthetics, make sure you go to a vet who is specialized in brachycephalic breeds (shortnosed/flat faced dogs). The best way is to prevent, clean your dog’s teeth daily so a visit to the vet and anesthetics are not necessary

An example of a  vet cleaning bulldog’s teeth without anesthesia

 

Make Sure You keep your Bulldog Smiling 😀

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Cleaning Tearstains

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Tear stains are a common problem in the Bulldog breed. Most short faced and wrinkled breeds will need daily care for their wrinkles.  Most of the time a soft tissue will clean the wrinkles from dust or dirt. But sometimes the stain won’t go away and the wrinkles can become irritated. The wrinkles will become a red/brownish color and their fur will be wet.

A very important sidenote on this subject: In a lot of cases the wrinkles are not just dirty from playing outside or from active tear glands. They can be irritated from eyeproblems (like cherryeye or entropion), minerals in the water or allergies (like polls, grain or other food allergies). In these cases no cleaning or cream will solve the problem. So if you are in doubt or when the methods mentioned below don’t work make sure to visit a veterinarian for advice.

So the first thing to do, is to adress the source of the problem and than you can begin to clean and prevent the tear stains. Clean the wrinkles with an eyecleaner daily, get all the filth out those wrinkles and really rub your fingers trough their wrinkles, wipe away from the corner of the eye. When the fitlh is gone, there will still be a stain make sure to completly dry the area after you cleaned it, this is really important! Some people rub ointment on it after cleaning but my advice is to only do that when the wrinkles are clean and stainfree already and when the fur needs to grow back. When their wrinkles are still irritated it is better to keep the area dry and clean.

When a general eyecleaner doesn’t work you can try a eyecleaner with antibiotics in it. You should only use cleaners with antibiotics for a short period of time. Use it to remove the stain and than proceed with a general eyecleaner and unscented cleaning wipes to keep it clean. These methods can also be used for irritated nosewrinkles. If your Bulldog does not have any medical reasons for the tear stains they will be easy to remove with a couple of cleanings. I clean my dogs daily with unscented baby wipes (their ears, nose wrinkles and corners of the eye) and they have no tear stains or dirty wrinkles.

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I asked our members what their experiences were with cleaning tear stains.  Since I have no experiences with the methods named below I can not vouch for these methods.
Here are some of the tips they shared with us:


Thea van Oosten van der Wulp, Ali Bourdeau:
Douxo pads

Sherri Holman-Griffin:
I use baby wipes daily and a little hibiclens if they get irritated. My two love to lick each others faces and ears, so sometimes it’s twice a day cleanings from mom to get the extra slobber off. I also use coconut oil orally and topically

Michelle Allison: 
Diluted hibiscrub washed in the channels everyday keeps bacteria at bay

Kelly Adamchak Durdan:
I thought i would never get rid of my Guys tear stains.I tried every thing under the sun,Till my vet gave me Pharmaseb wipes..these wipes have been heaven sent they cleared up there wrinkles took away the tear stains no more stinky faces..love these wipes

Dorinda van Kessel:
Just a cottonball drowned in milk. It’s a wonder!

Betty Davey:
I used plain old desitin for diaper rash.

Carry Vrolijk:

I use Malaseb shampoo (available at the vet), Anointing pure, leave for 10 minutes and then clean with water (so get off) Then a thin layer sudocreme So I do it with my bulldog Ozzy, and it works

Paula Waterbeek:
The stains can you remove with cooked water and betadine shampoo de stains by the eye dont clean more dan twice a week because when je remove the stains daily the tears production activaded its a normal proces off the eyes When the stains are verry wet , only dry tthe stains and clean only 2 times in a week.

Sebastián Trujillo:
My bully had bad tear stains and a very bad soaring inside the wrinkle over his nose. I tried every thing until a vet told me to use Savlon liquid. I used it once a day cleaning gently with cotton. Those tear stains disappeared.

Kimberly Simmons Daily:
Antifungal wipes work best for us

Vanessa Hinojosa Eubank:
Mal-A-Ket Wipes by DermaPet from Entirelypets.com works wonders!

Inedabully Million:
I use stridex medicated pads under the nose stock and for the tear area. the stridex kills any fungus, yeast and bacteria. I use it daily if there is a problem and then a couple times a week after that or as needed.

Sian O’Brien:
Sensitive baby wipes, allow to dry then sudocrem or sensitive diaper rash cream, careful to avoid the eyes. Irradiates the yeast, soothes redness, smells good, reduces the swelling and works!

Shannon Haley-Anderson:
Apple cider vinegar in their drinking water helps with tear stains also, but the root of the problem stems from what the dog is fed.

Sandra Bryant:
Filtered water in a stainless bowl is what I used and Annabella’s tear staining disappeared. I clean her folds, ears and entire body with unscented baby wipes daily

Vonny Robertson: I bath my babies with Douxo antiseptic shampoo, plus have the Douxo pads. Tear stains are just from active tear glands, which can be that way from wind/dust/my one puppy had tears already at 6 weeks old. Just got to keep the face clean firstly, but more importantly -dry. If you keep putting ointments or wet creams on, it’s just going to create a bacterial infection in the facial wrinkles. My bulldog vet says his motto is “clean and dry, clean and dry!”. Can’t make the tear production stop. Just got to keep it clean and dry

Jenna Adriaenssens:
I use baby wipes to clean and baby powder to dry.

Jennifer Palacios:
Baby wipes on the daily. Fragrant free of course. And I make a solution of part vinegar (small amount) with distilled water and clean the areas if needed once a day when it calms down every other day to weekly using a cotton ball pad.

Christina Smith:
I also put couple tablespoons of braggs raw apple cider vinegar in my bullies water.

Lynne Anderson: I use optrex eye lotion for humans on a cotton pad very safe to rub around the and does not sting and dry with a tissue

Annah V. Luker: I have a cat that cleans them daily! Highly recommended to get your bully a pet cat. For companionship & cleanliness. They are good friends

Related Links and Blogs:
Wrinkle Cleaning
More about Apple Cider Vinegar

Toxic Plants

The garden is a wonderful place for you and your dog to relax. But this happy place can also be a dangerous place for your four legged friend. When asking for examples of dangerous things for dogs around the garden, most people will think of a hole in the fence or a pond or pool. But one of the most dangerous things is often underestimated… Plants.

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Dogs are very inquisitive. Sniffing, smelling, and tasting anything in sight is natural behavior for a dog. For that reason, we commonly see dogs ingest items that are not their food and at times can be very dangerous poisons. There are two major areas where such dangers may occur: inside the house, and outside of it.

Jessica Sue Robinson

As stated before the dangers of toxic plants is heavily underestimated. If you are a dog owner, know what plants you should keep your dog away from when walking outside and make sure to check the garden for any toxic plants. If you think that your animal has been poisoned contact your local veterinarian a.s.a.p.  When you know your dog ate a plant or flower make sure to tell the veterinarian the name of the plant/flower and if you do not know the name try to bring a sample with you.

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Most dogs will never bother to eat plants or flowers but even when your dog does not have an appetite for plants you have to be aware of the danger as a dogowner. A dog that never ate plants his whole life can suddenly begin to try eating them when having a stomach ache for example. Also puppies are known to chew on anything including plants.

 

 

List of Toxic Plants

 

More than 700 plants have been identified as producing toxic substances in sufficient amounts to cause harmful effects in animals. Poisonous plants produce a variety of toxic substances and cause reactions ranging from a light skin irritation or mild nausea to strokes or even death.

This list of toxic plants describes the most common and most toxic plants and mushrooms as seen inside the house, in the garden and in nature. You will have to take into account that most plants come in various shapes, sizes and colours, so the plants in your garden might look very different from the examples shown in the photo. Use the search functionality in this blog to check all plant names for toxicity.

 

Adam and Eve

Common Names: Arum, Lord-and-Ladies, Wake Robin, Starch Root, Bobbins, Cuckoo Plant
Scientific Name: Arum maculatum
Family: Araceae
Symptoms:Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Adam and Eve plant

Alocasia

Common Names: Elephant’s Ear
Scientific Name: Alocasia
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

elephants ear

Aloe 

Scientific Name: Aloe vera
Family: Liliaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, depression, diarrhea, anorexia, tremors, change in urine color.

aloe vera

Amaryllis

Common Names: Belladonna lily, Saint Joseph lily, Cape Belladonna, Naked Lady
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Symptoms: vomiting, depression, diarrhea, abdominal pain, hypersalivation, anorexia, tremors
amaryllis 2

Ambrosia Mexicana

Common Names: Jerusalem Oak, Feather Geranium
Scientific Name: Chenopodium botrys
Family: Chenopodiaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, anorexia, lethargic

Chenopodium botrys

 

American Bittersweet

Common Names: Bittersweet, Waxwork, Shrubby Bittersweet, False Bittersweet, Climbing Bittersweet
Scientific Name: Celastrus scandens
Family: Celastraceae
Symptoms: weakness, convulsions, gastroenteritis, vomiting, diarrhea

Celastrus scandens

 

American Holly

Common Names: English Holly, European Holly, Oregon Holly, Inkberry, Winterberry
Scientific Name: Ilex opaca
Family: Aquifoliaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea and depression. Leaves and berries are low toxicity

Ilex opaca

American Mandrake

Common Names: Mayapple, Indian Apple Root, Umbrella Leaf, Wild Lemon, Hog Apple, Duck’s Foot, Raccoonberry
Scientific Name: Podophyllum peltatum
Family: Berberidaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, panting, redness of the skin, skin ulcers

Podophyllum peltatum

American Yew

Scientific Name: Taxus canidensus
Family: Taxaceae
Symptoms: Tremors, difficulty breathing, vomiting, seizures, sudden death from acute heart failure

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Andromeda Japonica

Common Names: Pieris, Lily of the Valley Bush
Scientific Name: Pieris japonica
Family: Ericaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, depression, cardiovascular collapse, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, low blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse and death. Ingestion of a few leaves can cause serious problems

Pieris japonica

Angelica Tree

Common Names: Hercules’ Club, Devil’s Walking Stick, Prickly Ash, Prickly Elder
Scientific Name: Aralia spinosa
Family: Araliaceae
Symptoms: Skin and oral irritation, hypersalivation, vomiting, diarrhea

Aralia spinosa

 

Apple

Common Names: Includes crabapples
Scientific Name: Malus sylvestrus
Family: Rosaceae
Symptoms: Stems, leaves, seeds contain cyanide, particularly toxic in the process of wilting: brick red mucous membranes, dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, panting, shock

Malus sylvestris

 

Apricot

Common Names: Group also includes Plum, Peach, Cherry
Scientific Name: Prunus armeniaca
Family: Rosaceae
Symptoms: Stems, leaves, seeds contain cyanide, particularly toxic in the process of wilting: brick red mucous membranes, dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, panting, shock

Prunus armeniaca

Arrow-Head Vine

Common Names: Nephthytis, Green Gold Naphthysis, African Evergreen, Trileaf Wonder
Scientific Name: Syngonium podophyllum
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Syngonium podophyllum

 

Arum

Common Names: Cuckoo-pint, Lord-and-Ladies, Adam-and-Eve, Starch Root, Bobbins, Wake Robin
Scientific Name: Arum maculatum
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Arum maculatum

Arum Lily

Common Names: Calla Lily, Pig Lily, White Arum, Trumpet Lily, Florist’s Calla, Garden Calla
Scientific Name: Zantedeschia aethiopica
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Zantedeschia aethiopica

 

Asparagus Fern

Common Names: Asparagus, Emerald Feather, Emerald Fern, Sprengeri Fern, Plumosa Fern, Lace Fern, Racemose Asparagus, Shatavari
Scientific Name: Asparagus densiflorus cv sprengeri
Family: Liliaceae
Symptoms: allergic dermatitis with repeated dermal exposure. Berry ingestion could result in gastric upset, vomiting, abdominal pain, or diarrhea

Asparagus densiflorus 2

Australian Ivy Palm

Common Names: Schefflera, Umbrella Tree, Octopus Tree, Starleaf
Scientific Name: Brassaia actinophylla
Family: Araliaceae
Symptoms: While this plant does contain potentially toxic substances, the most common effects seen are mild vomiting and diarrhea

Australian Nut

Common Names: Macadamia Nut, Queensland Nut
Scientific Name: Macadamia integrifolia
Family: Proteaceae
Symptoms: Depression, hyperthermia, weakness, muscular stiffness, vomiting, tremors, increased heartrate. Only reported in dogs at this time

Macadamia integrifolia

Australian Pine

Common Names: Norfolk Pine, House Pine, Norfolk Island Pine
Scientific Name: Araucaria heterophylla
Family: Araucariaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, depression

Araucaria heterophylla

Autumn Crocus

Common Names: Meadow Saffron
Scientific Name: Colchicum autumnale
Family: Liliaceae
Symptoms: oral irritation, bloody vomiting, diarrhea, shock, multi-organ damage, bone marrow suppression

Colchicum autumnale

Azalea

Common Names: Rosebay, Rhododendron
Scientific Name: Rhododendron
Family: Ericaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, hypotension, CNS depression, cardiovascular collapse and death. Ingestion of a few leaves can cause serious problems. The toxic principle interferes with normal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and nerve function. Clinical effects typically occur within a few hours after ingestion, and can include acute digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements/diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate, coma or even death

Rhododendron

 

Baby Doll Ti Plant

Common Names: Ti-Plant, Good-Luck Plant, Hawaiian Ti Plant
Scientific Name: Cordyline terminalis
Family: Agavaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting (occasionally with blood)

Cordyline terminalis

Baby’s Breath

Common Names: Maidens Breath
Scientific Name: Gypsophila elegans
Family: Caryophyllaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea

Gypsophila elegans

Barbados Aloe

Common Names: Medicine Plant, True Aloe
Scientific Name: Aloe barbadensis
Family: Aloaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, change in urine color (red)

Aloe barbadensis

Barbados Pride

Common Names: Peacock Flower, Dwarf Poinciana
Scientific Name: Caesalpinia pulcherrima
Family: Peas
Symptoms: Vomiting and diarrhea

Caesalpinia pulcherrima

Barbados Pride 2

Common Names: Bird of Paradise, Poinciana, Brazilwood
Scientific Name: Poinciana gilliesii
Family: Leguminosae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty swallowing and incoordination is possible. Deaths in rabbits have been reported

Poinciana gilliesii

Bay Laurel

Common Names: Sweet Bag, Bay Tree, Tree Laurel, Laurel Tree, Laurel
Scientific Name: Laurus nobilis
Family: Laurus nobilis
Symptoms: Vomiting and diarrhea, Large ingestion of whole leaves can cause obstruction

Laurus nobilis

Bead Tree

Common Names: China Ball Tree, Paradise Tree, Persian Lilac, White Cedar, Japanese Bead Tree, Texas Umbrella Tree, Pride-of-India, Chinaberry Tree
Scientific Name: Melia azedarach
Family: Meliaceae
Symptoms: Diarrhea, vomiting, weakness, and seizures. The berries are the most toxic but the bark, leaves, and flowers are also toxic

Begonia

Scientific Name: Begonia spp.
Family: Begoniaceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing. Tubers are the most toxic

Begonia

Bergamot Orange
Common Names: Bergamot, Citrus bergamia
Scientific Name: Citrus Aurantium
Family: Rutaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, depression; potential photosensitivity

Bird’s Tongue Flower

Common Names: Bird of Paradise Flower, Crane Flower
Scientific Name: Strelitzia reginae
Family: Strelitziaceae
Symptoms: Mild nausea, vomiting, drowsiness; caused mainly by fruit and seeds. Should not be confused with Bird of Paradise which is more toxic

Strelitzia reginae

Bishop’s Weed

Common Names: Greater Ammi, False Queen Anne’s Lace
Scientific Name: Ammi majus
Family: Apiaceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Ammi majus

Bitter Root

Common Names: Dogbane Hemp, Indian Hemp
Scientific Name: Apocynum androsaemifolium
Family: Apocynaceae
Symptoms: Diarrhea sometimes with blood, slow heart rate, weakness

Black Calla

Common Names: Solomon’s Lily, Wild Calla, Wild Arum
Scientific Name: Arum palestinum
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

 

Black Laurel

Common Names: Dog Hobble, Dog Laurel, Fetter Bush, Sierra Laurel
Scientific Name: Leucothoe davisiae
Family: Ericaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, depression, cardiovascular collapse, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, low blood pressure, death. Ingestion of a few leaves can cause serious problems

Leucothoe davisiae

 

Black Nightshade

Common Names: Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade
Scientific Name: Solanum nigrum
Family: Solanaceae
Symptoms: Hypersalivation, inappetence, severe gastrointestinal upset, diarrhea, drowsiness, confusion, behavioral change, weakness, dilated pupils, slow heart rate

Solanum nigrum

 

Black Walnut

Scientific Name: Juglans nigra
Family: Juglandaceae
Symptoms: moldy nuts can grow molds that cause tremors and seizures. Onset of clinical signs as early as 8 hours after exposure to bedding; signs can include fluid build up in the legs, laminitis, increased heart and respiratory rate, increased body temperature, mild colic

Juglandaceae

 

 

Borage

Common Names: Starflower
Scientific Name: Borage officinalis
Family: Boraginceae
Symptoms: Vomiting and diarrhea

Borage officinalis

 

Boxwood

Scientific Name: Buxus
Family: Buxaceae
Symptoms: vomiting, diarrhea

Buxaceae

Branching Ivy

Common Names: English Ivy, Glacier Ivy, Needlepoint Ivy, Sweetheart Ivy, California Ivy
Scientific Name: Hedera helix
Family: Araliaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, abdominal pain, hypersalivation, diarrhea. Foliage is more toxic than berries

Hedera helix

 

Bread and Butter Plant

Common Names: Indian Borage, Spanish Thyme, Coleus, Maratha, Militini, East Indian Thyme
Scientific Name: Coleus ampoinicus
Family: Labiatae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, depression, anorexia, occasionally bloody diarrhea or vomiting

Coleus ampoinicus

Brunfelsia

Common Names: Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow, Kiss-Me-Quick, Lady-of-the-Night, Fransiscan Rain Tree
Scientific Name: Brunfelsia
Family: Solanaceae
Symptoms: Tremors, seizures (for several days), diarrhea, vomiting, hypersalivation, lethargy, incoordination, coughing

Brunfelsia

Buckeye
Additional Common Names: Horse Chestnut
Scientific Name: Aesculus
Family: Hippocastanaceae
Symptoms: Severe vomiting and diarrhea, depression or excitement, dilated pupils, coma, convulsions, wobbly

Aesculus

Buckwheat

Scientific Name: Fagopyrum species
Family: Polygonaceae
Symptoms: Photosensitization (ulcerative and exudative dermatitis)

Polygonaceae

Buddhist Pine

Common Names: Yew Pine, Japanese Yew, Southern Yew, Podocarpus
Scientific Name: Podocarpus macrophylla
Family: Podocarpaceae
Symptoms: Severe vomiting and diarrhea

Podocarpus macrophylla

Burning Bush

Common Names: Wahoo, Spindle Tree
Scientific Name: Euonymus atropurpurea
Family: Celastraceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, weakness. Heart rhythm abnormalities with large doses

Euonymus atropurpurea

Buttercup

Common Names: Butter Cress, Figwort
Scientific Name: Ranunculus sp.
Family: Ranunculaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, depression, anorexia, hypersalivation and wobbly gait

Ranunculus

Caladium

Common Names: Malanga, Elephant’s Ears, Stoplight, Seagull, Mother-in-law Plant, Pink Cloud, Texas Wonder, Angel-Wings, Exposition, Candidum, Fancy-leaved Caladium
Scientific Name: Caladium hortulanum
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Caladium hortulanum

Calamondin Orange

Scientific Name: Citrus mitis
Family: Rutaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, depression; potential photosensitivity

Citrus mitis

 

Cape Jasmine

Common Names: Gardenia
Scientific Name: Gardenia jasminoides
Family: Rubiaceae
Symptoms: Mild vomiting and/or diarrhea, hives

Gardenia jasminoides

 

Caraway

Common Names: Meridian Fennel, Persian Cumin
Scientific Name: Carum carvi
Family: Umbelliferae
Symptoms: Vomiting and diarrhea

Carum carvi

Cardboard Palm

Common Names: cycads and zamias
Scientific Name: Zamia furfuracea
Family: Cycadaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, melena, icterus, increased thirst, hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, bruising, coagulopathy, liver damage, liver failure, death

Zamia furfuracea

Cardinal Flower

Common Names: Lobelia, Indian Pink
Scientific Name: Lobelia cardinalis
Family: Campanulaceae
Symptoms: Depression, diarrhea, vomiting, excessive salivation, abdominal pain, heart rhythm disturbances

Lobelia cardinalis

Carnation

Common Names: Pinks, Wild Carnation, Sweet William
Scientific Name: Dianthus caryophyllus
Family: Caryophyllaceae
Symptoms: Mild gastrointestinal signs, mild dermatitis

Dianthus caryophyllus

Castor Bean Plant

Common Names: Castor Oil Plant, Mole Bean Plant, African Wonder Tree, Castor Bean
Scientific Name: Ricinus communis
Family: Euphorbiaceae
Symptoms: Beans are very toxic: oral irritation, burning of mouth and throat, increase in thirst, vomiting, diarrhea, kidney failure, convulsions. Access to ornamental plants or pruned foliage most common in poisonings. Ricin is a highly toxic component that inhibits protein synthesis; ingestion of as little as one ounce of seeds can be lethal. Signs typically develop 12 to 48 hours after ingestion, and include loss of appetite, excessive thirst, weakness, colic, trembling, sweating, loss of coordination, difficulty breathing, progressive central nervous system depression, and fever. As syndrome progresses, bloody diarrhea may occur, and convulsions and coma can precede death

Ricinus communis

Ceriman

Common Names: Cutleaf Philodendron, Hurricane Plant, Swiss Cheese Plant, Mexican Breadfruit
Scientific Name: Monstera deliciosa
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Monstera deliciosa

Chamomile

Common Names: Manzanilla, Garden Chamomile, Roman Chamomile, True Chamomile, Corn Feverfew, Barnyard Daisy, Ground-apple, Turkey-weed
Scientific Name: Anthemis nobilis
Family: Compositae
Symptoms: Contact dermatitis, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, allergic reactions. Long term use can lead to bleeding tendencies

Anthemis nobilis

Chandelier Plant

Common Names: Mother-In-Law-Plant, Kalanchoe, Devils Backbone, Mother of Millions
Scientific Name: Kalanchoe tubiflora
Family: Crassulaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, abnormal heart rhythm

Kalanchoe tubiflora

Charming Dieffenbachia

Scientific Name: Dieffenbachia amoena
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth , tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Dieffenbachia amoena

Cherry

Scientific Name: Prunus
Family: Rosaceae
Symptoms: Stems, leaves, seeds contain cyanide, particularly toxic in the process of wilting: brick red mucous membranes, dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, panting, shock

Cherry

Chinese Evergreen

Scientific Name: Aglaonema modestum
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Chinese Jade

Common Names: Silver Jade Plant, Silver Dollar
Scientific Name: Crassula arborescens
Family: Crassulaceae
Symptoms: Nausea, retching

Crassula arborescens
Chives

Scientific Name: Allium schoenoprasum
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, breakdown of red blood cells, blood in urine, weakness, high heart rate, panting

Allium schoenoprasum

Christmas Rose

Common Names: Hellebore, Lenten Rose, Easter Rose
Scientific Name: Helleborus niger
Family: Ranunculaceae
Symptoms: Drooling, abdominal pain and diarrhea, colic, depression

Helleborus niger

Chrysanthemum

Common Names: Daisy, Mum; many varieties
Scientific Name: Chrysanthemum spp.
Family: Compositae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, hypersalivation, incoordination, dermatitis

Chrysanthemum

Clematis

Common Names: Virgin’s Bower, Leatherflower
Scientific Name: Clematis sp.
Family: Ranunculaceae
Symptoms: Salivation, vomiting, diarrhea

Clematis

 

Climbing Lily

Common Names: Gloriosa Lily, Glory Lily, Superb Lily
Scientific Name: Gloriosa superba
Family: Liliaceae
Symptoms: Salivation, vomiting (sometimes with blood), diarrhea (sometimes with blood), shock, kidney failure, liver damage, bone marrow suppression

Gloriosa superba
Clivia Lily

Common Names: Kaffir Lily, Clivies, Caffre Lily, Cape Clivia, Klivia
Scientific Name: Clivia sp.
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, salvation, diarrhea; large ingestions cause convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors and cardiac arrhythmias. Bulbs are the most poisonous part

Clivia

Coffee Tree

Common Names: Wild Coffee, Geranium-Leaf Aralia
Scientific Name: Polyscias guilfoylei
Family: Araliaceae
Symptoms: Contact dermatitis, vomiting

Polyscias guilfoylei

Common Privet

Common Names: Privet, Amur, Wax-leaf
Scientific Name: Ligustrum vulgare
Family: Oleaceae
Symptoms: Gastrointestinal upset , incoordination, increased heart rate, in rare cases death

Ligustrum vulgareCorn Plant

Common Names: Corn Plant, Cornstalk Plant, Dracaena, Dragon Tree, Ribbon Plant
Scientific Name: Dracaena fragrans
Family: Agavaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting sometimes with blood, depression, anorexia, hypersalivation

Dracaena fragrans

Cordatum

Common Names: Fiddle-Leaf, Horsehead Philodendron, Heartleaf Philodendron, Panda Plant, Split Leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Red Emerald, Red Princess, Saddle Leaf
Scientific Name: Philodendron oxycardium
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Philodendron oxycardium

Coontie Palm

Common Names: Sago Palm, Cardboard Palm, cycads and zamias
Scientific Name: Zamia pumila
Family: Cycadaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, melena, icterus, increased thirst, hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, bruising, coagulopathy, liver damage, liver failure, death

Zamia pumila

Cow parsnip

Common Names: Giant Hogweed
Scientific Name: Heracleum maximum
Family: Apiaceae
Symptoms: Photosensitization (ulcerative and exudative dermatitis), ocular toxicity

Heracleum maximum

Cowbane

Common Names: Water Hemlock, Poison Parsnip
Scientific Name: Cicuta
Family: Apiaceae
Symptoms: Diarrhea, seizures, tremors, extreme stomach pain, dilated pupils, fever, bloat, respiratory depression, and death

Cicuta
Cycads

Common Names: Sago Palm, Fern Palm
Scientific Name: Cycas and Zamia
Family: Cycadaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting (may be bloody), dark stools, jaundice, increased thirst, bloody diarrhea, bruising, liver failure, death. 1-2 seeds can be fatal

Cycas

Cyclamen

Common Names: Sowbread
Scientific Name: Cyclamen spp
Family: Primulaceae
Symptoms: Salivation, vomiting, diarrhea. Following large ingestions of tubers: heart rhythm abnormalities, seizures, death

Cyclamen

Daffodil

Common Names: Narcissus, Jonquil, Paper White
Scientific Name: Narcissus
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, salvation, diarrhea; large ingestions cause convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors and cardiac arrhythmias. Bulbs are the most poisonous part

Narcissus

Dahlia

Common Names: Many varieties
Scientific Name: Dahlia
Family: Compositae
Toxicity: Toxic to Dogs, Toxic to Cats
Toxic Principles: Unknown
Symptoms: Mild gastrointestinal signs, mild dermatitis

Dahlia

Desert Azalea

Common Names: Desert Rose, Mock Azalea, Sabi Star, Impala Lily, Kudu Lily
Scientific Name: Adenium obesum
Family: Apocynaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, depression, irregular heart beat, death

Adenium obesum
Devils Ivy

Common Names: Pothos, Golden Pothos, Taro Vine, Ivy Arum
Scientific Name: Epipremnum aureum
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Epipremnum aureum

Dock

Common Names: Sorrel
Scientific Name: Rumex
Family: Polygonaceae
Symptoms: Kidney failure, tremors, salivation

Dog Daisy

Common Names: Dog Fennel
Scientific Name: Achillea millefolium
Family: Compositae
Symptoms: Increased urination, vomiting, diarrhea, dermatitis

English Yew

Common Names: Western Yew, Pacific Yew, Japanese Yew, Anglo-Japanese Yew
Scientific Name: Taxus baccata
Family: Taxaceae
Symptoms: Tremors, difficulty breathing, vomiting, seizures (dogs), sudden death from acute heart failure

Taxus baccata
Eucalyptus

Common Names: Many cultivars
Scientific Name: Eucalyptus
Family: Myrtaceae
Symptoms: Salivation, vomiting, diarrhea, depression, weakness

Eucalyptus

European Bittersweet

Common Names: Climbing Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade
Scientific Name: Solanum dulcamara
Family: Solanaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea – common. Drowsiness, low blood pressure, low heart rate – uncommon

Solanum dulcamara

Everlasting Pea

Common Names: Sweet Pea, Perennial Pea
Scientific Name: Lathyrus latifolius
Family: Fabaceae
Symptoms: Weakness, lethargy, pacing, head pressing, tremors, seizures and possibly death

Lathyrus latifolius

 

 

 

Fig

Common Names: Weeping Fig, Indian Rubber Plant
Scientific Name: Ficus benjamina
Family: Moraceae
Symptoms: Contact with the skin can cause dermatitis, ingestion can cause oral irritation, salivation and vomiting

Ficus benjamina

Fire Lily

Common Names: Amaryllis, Barbados Lily, Lily of the Palace, Ridderstjerne
Scientific Name: Hippeastrum spp.
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, salvation, diarrhea; large ingestions cause convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors and cardiac arrhythmias. Bulbs are the most poisonous part

Hippeastrum

Flag

Common Names: Iris, Snake Lily, Water Flag
Scientific Name: Iris species
Family: Iridaceae
Symptoms: Salivation, vomiting, drooling,lethargy, diarrhea. Highest concentration in rhizomes

snake lily

Flamingo Flower

Common Names: Flamingo Lily, Tail Flower, Oilcloth Flower, Pigtail Plant, Painter’s Pallet
Scientific Name: Anthurium scherzerianum
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Anthurium scherzerianum

Fleabane

Common Names: Showy Daisy, Horseweed, Seaside Daisy
Scientific Name: Erigeron speciosus
Family: Asteraceae
Symptoms: Mild vomiting, diarrhea

Fleabane

Florida Beauty

Common Names: Gold Dust Dracaena, Spotted Dracaena
Scientific Name: Dracaena surculosa
Family: Cannaceae
Symptoms: In cats: dilated pupils, breathing difficulty, abdominal pain, increased heartrate and drooling. In both cats and dogs: vomiting, depression, inappetence, drooling, incoordination, and weakness

Dracaena

Foxglove

Scientific Name: Digitalis purpurea
Family: Scrophalariaceae
Symptoms: Cardiac arrhythmias, vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, cardiac failure, death

Foxglove

Hyacinth

Scientific Name: Hyacinthus orientalis
Family: Liliaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, dermatitis and allergic reactions. Bulbs contain highest amount of toxin

Garden Hyacinth
Gladiola

Common Names: Many cultivars
Scientific Name: Gladiolus species
Family: Iridaceae
Symptoms: Salivation, vomiting, drooling,lethargy, diarrhea. Highest concentration in the bulbs

Gladiola

Golden Birds Nest

Common Names: Snake Plant, Mother-in-Law’s Tongue, Good Luck Plant
Scientific Name: Sansevieria trifasciata
Family: Agavaceae
Symptoms: Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea

Sansevieria trifasciata

Grapefruit

Scientific Name: Citrus paradisii
Family: Rutaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, depression; potential photosensitivity

Grass Palm

Common Names: Giant Dracaena, Palm Lily
Scientific Name: Cordyline australis
Family: Agavaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting (occasionally with blood)

Cordyline australis

Heartleaf Philodendron

Common Names: Saddle Leaf, Horsehead Philodendron, Cordatum, Fiddle-Leaf, Panda Plant, Red Emerald, Red Princess
Scientific Name: Philodendron bipennifolium
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Philodendron bipennifolium

Heavenly Bamboo

Common Names: Sacred Bamboo, Nandina
Scientific Name: Nandina domestica
Family: Berberidaceae
Symptoms: Weakness, incoordination, seizures, coma, respiratory failure, death

Nandina domestica

Hibiscus

Common Names: Rose of Sharon, Rose of China
Scientific Name: Hibiscus syriacus
Family: Malvaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, nausea, anorexia

Hibiscus syriacus

Hops

Scientific Name: Humulus lupulus
Family: Cannabidaceae
Symptoms: Dogs: panting, high body temperature, seizures, death

Humulus lupulus

Hortensia

Common Names: Hydrangea, Hills of Snow, Seven Bark
Scientific Name: Hydrangea arborescens
Family: Hydrangeaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, depression, diarrhea. Cyanide intoxication is rare – usually produces more of a gastrointestinal disturbance

Hydrangea arborescens
Hosta

Common Names: Plantain Lily, Funkia
Scientific Name: Hosta plataginea
Family: Liliaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, depression


Jack in the Pulpit

Common Names: Three-leaved indian turnip, Devil’s dear, Wake robin, Starch wort, Wild turnip, Dragon root, Bog onion, Pepper turnip, Brown dragon, Memory root
Scientific Name: Arisaema triphyllum
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Arisaema triphyllum
Jade Plant

Common Names: Baby Jade, Dwarf rubber plant, Jade tree, Chinese rubber plant, Japanese rubber plant
Scientific Name: Crassula argentea
Family: Crassulaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, depression

Crassula argentea
Jerusalem Cherry

Common Names: Natal cherry, Winter cherry
Scientific Name: Solanum pseudocapsicum
Family: Solanaceae
Symptoms: Gastrointestinal disturbances, possible ulceration of the gastrointestinal system, seizures, depression, respiratory depression, and shock

Solanum pseudocapsicum

Klamath Weed

Common Names: St. John’s Wort
Scientific Name: Hypericum perforatum
Family: Clusiaceae
Symptoms: Photosensitization, dermatitis

Hypericum perforatum

Lacy Tree Philodendron

Scientific Name: Philodendron selloum
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of the mouth, lips, tongue, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty in swallowing

Philodendron selloum

Laurel

Common Names: Mountain laurel, Spoonwood, Mountain Ivy, Calico Bush, Ivy Bush
Scientific Name: Kalmia latifolia
Family: Ericaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, depression, cardiovascular collapse, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, low blood pressure, death. Ingestion of a few leaves can cause serious problems

Kalmia latifolia

Lavender

Common Names: Common Lavender, English Lavender
Scientific Name: Lavendula angustifolia
Family: Lamiaceae
Symptoms: Nausea, vomiting

Lavendula angustifolia

Leek

Common Names: Elephant Garlic
Scientific Name: Allium ampeloprasum
Family: Liliaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, breakdown of red blood cells (hemolytic anemia, Heinz body anemia), blood in urine, weakness, high heart rate, panting

Allium ampeloprasum
Lemon Grass

Common Names: Oil Grass
Scientific Name: Cymbopogon citratus
Family: Poaceae
Symptoms: Chronic cystitis, urine leaking, hind leg weakness

Cymbopogon citratus

Lily of the Valley

Scientific Name: Convallaria majalis
Family: Liliaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, irregular heart beat, low blood pressure, disorientation, coma, seizures

Convallaria majalis

Lime

Scientific Name: Citrus aurantifolia
Family: Rutaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, depression; potential photosensitivity

Citrus aurantifolia

Lovage

Common Names: Maggi plant, Smellage
Scientific Name: Levisticum officinale
Family: Apiaceae
Symptoms: Diuretic, increased urination

Levisticum officinale

 

Malanga

Common Names: Caladium, Elephant’s Ears
Scientific Name: Colocasia esculenta
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Colocasia esculenta

Maleberry

Common Names: Staggerbush, Fetterbush
Scientific Name: Lyonia
Family: Ericaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, lethargic, cardiovascular collapse, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, low blood pressure, death. Ingestion of a few leaves can cause serious problems

Lyonia

Marjoram

Common Names: Knotted Marjoram, Pot Marjoram
Scientific Name: Origanum majorana
Family: Lamiaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting and diarrhea

Origanum majorana

Mauna Loa Peace Lily

Common Names: Peace Lily
Scientific Name: Spathiphyllum
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Spathiphyllum
Mayweed

Common Names: Poison Daisy, Stinking Chamomile
Scientific Name: Anthemis cotula
Family: Asteraceae
Symptoms: Contact dermatitis, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, allergic reactions. Long term use can lead to bleeding tendencies

Anthemis cotula

Milkweed

Scientific Name: Asclepias species
Family: Asclepiadaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, profound depression, weakness, anorexia, and diarrhea are common; may be followed by seizures, difficulty breathing, rapid, weak pulse, dilated pupils, kidney or liver failure, coma, respiratory paralysis and death

Asclepiadaceae

Mint

Common Names: Garden Mint
Scientific Name: Mentha
Family: Lamiaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting and diarrhea

Mentha

Mistletoe

Common Names: American Mistletoe
Scientific Name: Phoradendron flavescens
Family: Viscaceae
Symptoms: Gastrointestinal disorders, cardiovascular collapse, dyspnea, bradycardia, erratic behavior, (hallucinogenic in humans). Vomiting, diarrhea, low blood pressure

Phoradendron flavescens
Morning Glory

Scientific Name: Ipomoea
Family: Convolvulaceae
Symptoms: Gastrointestinal upset, agitation, tremors, disorientation, ataxia, anorexia. Seeds may cause hallucination, may cause diarrhea

Ipomoea

Nicotiana

Common Names: Tree Tobacco, Tobacco, Mustard Tree
Scientific Name: Nicotiana glauca
Family: Solanaceae
Symptoms: Hyperexcitability then depression, vomiting, incoordination, paralysis, death is possible

Nicotiana glauca
Oleander

Common Names: Rose-Bay
Scientific Name: Nerium oleander
Family: Apocynaceae
Symptoms: Poisonings can occur from acess to prunings or fallen branches, or ornamentals around horse show areas. All parts contain a highly toxic cardiac glycoside much like digitoxin, and can cause colic, diarrhea (possibly bloody), sweating, incoordination, shallow/difficult breathing, muscle tremors, recumbency, and possibly death from cardiac failure

Nerium oleander
Onion

Scientific Name: Allium cepa
Family: Liliaceae
Symptoms: Gastrointestinal upset, hemolytic anemia, vomiting, breakdown of red blood cells, blood in urine, weakness, high heart rate, panting

Allium cepa
Orange

Scientific Name: Citrus sinensis
Family: Rutaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, depression; potential photosensitivity


Oregano

Common Names: Greek Oregano
Scientific Name: Origanum vulgare hirtum
Family: Lamiaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting and diarrhea

Oregano
Pacific Yew

Common Names: English Yew, Western Yew, Japanese Yew, Anglo-Japanese Yew
Scientific Name: Taxus brevifolia
Family: Taxaceae
Symptoms: Tremors, difficulty breathing, vomiting, seizures (dogs), sudden death from acute heart failure

Taxus brevifolia
Parsley

Common Names: Italian Parsley, Hamburg Parsley, Turnip-rooted Parsley
Scientific Name: Petroselinum crispum
Family: Apiaceae
Symptoms: Photosensitization, dermatitis, ocular toxicity

Petroselinum crispum
Peony

Scientific Name: Paeonis officinalis
Family: Paeniaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea

Paeonis officinalis
Periwinkle

Common Names: Running Myrtle. Vinca
Scientific Name: Vinca rosea
Family: Apocynaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, low blood pressure, depression, tremors, seizures, coma, death

Vinca rosea

Pie Plant

Common Names: Rhubarb
Scientific Name: Rheum rhabarbarum
Family: Polygonaceae
Symptoms: Kidney failure, tremors, salivation

Rheum rhabarbarium

Portulaca

Common Names: Wild Portulaca, Rock Moss, Purslane, Pigwee, Pusley, Moss Rose
Scientific Name: Portulaca oleracea
Family: Portulacaceae
Symptoms: Muscle weakness, depression, diarrhea

Portulaca oleracea

Prayer Bean

Common Names: Rosary Pea, Buddhist rosary bead, Indian Bead, Indian Licorice, Love Bean, Lucky Bean, Seminole Bead, Weather Plant
Scientific Name: Abrus precatorius
Family: Leguminosae
Symptoms: Severe vomiting and diarrhea (sometimes bloody), tremors, high heart rate, fever, shock, death. Seeds are very toxic

Abrus precatorius
Privet

Common Names: amur, wax-leaf, common privet
Scientific Name: Ligustrum japonicum
Family: Oleaceae
Symptoms: Gastrointestinal upset (most common), incoordination, increased heart rate, death

Ligustrum japonicum

Ranger’s Button

Common Names: White Heads
Scientific Name: Sphenosciadium capitellatum
Family: Apiaceae
Symptoms: Photosensitization, ocular toxicity

Sphenosciadium capitellatum

Red Marginated Dracaena

Common Names: straight-marginated dracaena
Scientific Name: Dracaena marginata
Family: Agavaceae
Symptoms: In cats: dilated pupils, abdominal pain, increased heartrate and drooling. In both cats and dogs: vomiting, depression, inappetence, drooling, incoordination, and weakness

Dracaena marginata
Satin Pothos

Common Names: Silk Pothos
Scientific Name: Scindapsus pictus
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of the mouth, lips, tongue, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty in swallowing

Scindapsus pictus

Scented Geranium

Common Names: Geraniums
Scientific Name: Pelargonium
Family: Geranilea
Symptoms: Nausea, muscle weakness, hypothermia in larger exposures

Skunk Cabbage

Common Names: Skunk Weed, Polecat Weed, Meadow Cabbage, Swamp Cabbage
Scientific Name: Symplocarpus foetidus
Family: Araceae
Symptoms: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing

Symplocarpus foetidus

Spring Parsley

Scientific Name: Cymopterus watsonii
Family: Apiaceae
Symptoms: Photosensitization (ulcerative and exudative dermatitis), ocular toxicity

Cymopterus watsonii

Striped Dracaena

Common Names: warneckii, janet craig plant
Scientific Name: Dracaena deremensis
Family: Agavaceae
Symptoms: In cats: dilated pupils, abdominal pain, increased heartrate and drooling. In both cats and dogs: vomiting, depression, inappetence, drooling, incoordination, and weakness


Tahitian Bridal Veil

Common Names: Gibasis Geniculata
Scientific Name: tradescantia multiflora
Family: Commelinaceae
Symptoms: Can cause mild gastrointestinal signs and dermatitis

tradescantia multiflora

Tomato Plant

Scientific Name: Lycopersicon
Family: Solanaceae
Symptoms: Hypersalivation, inappetence, severe gastrointestinal upset, diarrhea, drowsiness, confusion, behavioral change, weakness, dilated pupils, slow heart rate

Lycopersicon

Tulip

Scientific Name: Tulipa species
Family: Liliaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, depression, diarrhea, heavy breathing/panting The highest concentration of toxin in bulb

Tulipa

Wahoo

Common Names: Burning Bush, Spindle Tree
Scientific Name: Euonymus occidentalis
Family: Celastraceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, weakness. Heart rhythm abnormalities with large doses

Euonymus occidentalis

Wandering Jew

Common Names: Speedy Henry, Variegated Wandering Jew
Scientific Name: Tradescantia flumeninsis
Family: Commelinaceae
Symptoms: Dermatitis

Tradescantia flumeninsis

Water Hyacinth

Scientific Name: Eichhornia crassipes
Family: Pontederiaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting

Wisteria

Common names: Purple Rain
Scientific Name: wisteria species
Family: Fabaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting (sometimes with blood), diarrhea

wisteria

Yellow Oleander

Scientific Name: Thevetia peruviana
Family: Apocynaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, slow heart rate

Thevetia peruviana
Yucca

Scientific Name: Yucca
Family: Agavaceae
Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea , liver disease

Yucca

 

 

MUSHROOMS



They pop up everywhere, in yards, in the woods, in parks, alongside the road. Some dogs, like some people, like to eat them. But you have to be careful cause they can both be a gourmet delicacy . . . and a deadly poison.

Toxic mushrooms are classified into four categories (A, B, C, D), based on the clinical signs and their time of onset, and into seven groups (1-7) on the basis of the toxin they contain. However, because it is sometimes difficult to identify what type of mushroom your dog has consumed, you should always bring the suspected mushroom with you when you take your dog to the veterinarian.

Symptoms vary greatly depending on the type of mushroom that the dog ingested. Category A mushrooms, for example, are the most toxic and cause the destruction of cells, especially liver and kidney cells. Category B and C mushrooms, affect the nervous system, and category D mushrooms cause gastrointestinal irritation. The following are some of the more common symptoms associated with mushroom poisoning:

► Vomiting
► Diarrhea
► Excessive drooling
► Abdominal pain
► Lethargy
► Yellowing of the skin
► Uncoordinated movements
► Seizures
► Coma

The 5 most common Mushrooms that can poison your Dog

 

Autumn Galerina

Scientific Name: Galerina Marginata
Family: Hymenogastraceae
Symptoms: After initial gastrointestinal signs, an animal who has eaten these mushrooms will appear to improve, only to relapse several days later with liver and kidney failure

Galerina Marginata

 

Elf’s Saddle

Scientific Name: Helvella Lacunosa
Family: Helvellaceae
Symptoms: Abdominal distress, severe diarrhea, and vomiting. In severe cases, liver, kidney, and red blood cell damage may occur, possibly resulting in death

Helvella Lacunosa

False Morel

Scientific Name: Gyromitra esculenta
Family: Helvellaceae
Symptoms: If ingested, false morels can cause vomiting, diarrhea and seizures, and can sometimes be fatal

Gyromitra esculenta

Fly Agaric

Scientific Name: Amanita Muscaria
Family: Amanitaceae
Symptoms: Disorientation, drooling, vomiting. These mushrooms are frequently eaten by dogs. They have a fishy odor. The toxins ibotenic acid and muscimol are not lethal to humans but in rare instances can cause death in dogs

Amanita Muscaria
Jeweled Death Cap

Scientific Name: Amanita Gemmata
Family: Amanitaceae
Symptoms: confusion, visual distortion, delusions and convulsions

Amanita Gemmata
Related Blogs
Dangerous Foods
Heatstrokes
CPR
Dog Medication

Bulldog Interdigital Cysts

Interdigital Cysts, (growths between the toes). Nobody really knows what causes them, some people think it is a fungus and some think it is an ingrown hair or that it may form as a result of the penetration of the skin by a foreign body – frequently grass awns. They usually clear up on their own and I am of the opinion they should not be punctured because that can lead to infection. And if possible try to avoid the antibiotic route unless there is an infection. Interdigital cysts are common in some breeds of dog . They are soft to firm fluid-filled swellings that form in the web of skin between the toes. They sometimes rupture and discharge fluid or pus.

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Breed Occurrence

The following breeds of dog are said to develop interdigital cysts commonly :

  • English Bulldogs
  • German Shepherd Dogs
  • German Short-haired Pointers
  • Great Danes
  • Pekingese
  • Scottish Terriers
  • West Highland White Terriers

Signs

  • Pigmentation of the skin and hair between the toes (red-brown-black)
  • Soft to firm swelling(s) in the web of skin between the toes
  • Discharge fluid or pus
  • Increased licking or biting of the feet between the toes
  • Lameness

Complications
Bacterial infection is a secondary complication.

Diagnosis
Diagnosis is based upon the typical location and appearance of the swellings in the interdigital skin. XRays may be taken to detect foreign material eg metal, or underlying involvement of bone, and a biopsy may be taken to eliminate the possibility of cancer.

Treatment
Medical treatment involves the use of corticosteroids (like prednisolone) which are effective in some cases. Surgical exploration of the cysts will help to identify and remove any foreign material eg grass awns.
Surgical removal (excision) off the swellings is the usual outcome if a patient does not respond to medical treatment. Unfortunately recurrence at the same site or in another interdigital web is common.

Prognosis
Good if a foreign body can be identified and removed. Guarded if no primary cause can be found because recurrence is common.

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When the area is not infected applying the bath instructions below in an early stage this will help to dissolve it in a few days in 90% of the cases.
Soak your dogs paws (preferably two or three times a day) with Epsom salts. The easiest way to do this is to do in the tub or fill the laundry tub up with 2 to 3 inches of warm water and 1 cup of Epsom Salts.
Put your Bulldog in the tub and just pet him for about 10 minutes or so. After ten minutes or so have elapsed, put your bulldog on a thick towel and gently pat his affected foot dry.

Some people use the method below when this does not work. My last Bulldog had this problem a few times but the method named above always worked for her so I never used the method described below.
After the first bath with Epsom Salts and drying its paws, fill up a cup with about an inch of hydrogen peroxide and hold his paws in this for a few moments. The area and in particular the cyst itself will respond to the hydrogen peroxide with bubbling, where as the rest of his foot does not. This shows that there is catalase enzyme present in these areas, which is one of the components released when blood or damaged cells are present.

Remember always consult with your veterinarian before starting any kind of treatment.

Bulldog Food Tips

Some bulldogs love their food so much they eat too quickly, which can be bad for their digestion and can lead to stomach aches and vomitting. The faster they eat, the less they chew, which can cause them to choke. When they race through their food they are also swallowing large amounts of air. This can result in burping or passing gas, not enjoyable for those around but  relatively harmless.

Some dogs, typically large chested breeds, can cause a food bloat from the large amount of air and how much they eat. The chance of the stomach twisting while they are bloated with food or air is greatly increased. There are many theories of what causes a bloat that twists (Gastric Dilatation Volvulus) and eating fast is one of the most common. When the stomach twists it greatly decreases, or cuts off, blood supply to the stomach. This is life threatening and can cause serious irreversible damage to the stomach or death. They MUST be seen immediately by your veterinarian, there is NO home remedy.  A bloated belly, walking hunched over, attempting to vomit (unsuccessfully), listlessness and pacing around are the common symptoms seen with a stomachbloat.

So to prevent, stomach aches, burping, reduce the farting and decrease the chances of a stomach twist/bloat here are some simple tips to prevent your bulldog from eating to quickly.

One simple way is putting a ball into their foodbowl. This way they have to shove the ball from side to side to get the food and this will slow them down.
A rock will do aswell, be certain the object you place in the bowl it is too large for the dog to eat!

Another way is to put the food in 2 seperate bowls, placing them in 2 locations so the have to find it and have pause in between.

If your dog eats to fast always use a flat pan in stead of a deep bowl. That way, they won’t be able to take big mouthfuls of food and have to work more to get all the bits of kibble.

Most dogs are not smart enough to get the ball out and start munching again but when you have a bulldog that does, the following product shown in the video might be helpfull.

There are also several products available in stores and at the vets to help your dog slow down its eating.

A final important note: always give your dog 20 to 30 minutes after his meal to digest their food. Don’t let them play or run and cause this can also increas the chances of getting a stomach bloat or twist.

Bulldog Weight

A lot of dogs are overweight these days, putting them at risk of joint pain, diabetes, and shortened life spans. Several studies show that more than half of all pets are overweight or obese. The reasons for this obesisty is the same reason for obesity with people. An unhealthy diet and not enough excersise. Just as we’re eating larger portions and more snacks than a decade ago, so are our pets. Because our lives are busier, we’re less likely to get the exercise we need and less likely to take a long walk with our dogs. It might seem that an extra pound or two on our fourlegged companions isn’t so terrible. But that little bit can be a significant percentage of a pet’s total weight.

Some owners disregard the health hazards associated with overweight pets and instead focus on how cute their fat puppy looks. But overfeeding a fat dog is basically a form of cruelty. Overweight and obese pets not only have shorter life spans but also suffer from more medical problems during their lives, including back pain, arthritis, kidney disease, and diabetes, they’re also more expensive to care for as a result. Your dog can become stressed, depressed or agressive from an unhealthy lifestyle or diet. So it’s not only in the best interest for their physical health it is also very important for their mental health to get the right food and in combination with the right amount of excersise.


Bulldogs Weight

With Bulldogs I think this is even more important than with most other breeds. The Bulldog is a dog that might be hard to judge on weight cause of its unusual build. A lot of people think that Bulldogs are overweight when they are not. Some dogs are just build with broad chests will be labeled fat. But on the other hand there are a lot of Bulldog owners who love the natural chubbyness and wrinkles of the bulldog and by adding more pounds they think they are making their dog look better. Conclusion: You need to know the difference between muscle and fat and know that overweight dogs are not cute but unhealthy and unhappy.

How to Weigh your Dog

For puppies and small dogs you can use a kitchen scale.  To weigh your dog correctly, weigh yourself while holding your dog, then weigh yourself and substract your weight from the total. To check up on your dogs health it is best to regularly check your dogs weight. On average a Bulldogmen will weigh about 53-56 pounds (25-30kg)  and bitches  will weigh about 49-52 pounds (21-26kg). When your dog weighs more than the average it does not necessarily mean your dog is overweight.  If you have any doubt about your dogs weight contact your vet.

1 kg is ± 2.2 pounds

Read more on Dog Food and Dog Diets here:
https://baggybulldogs.wordpress.com/2012/07/05/dangerous-dog-food-and-food-tips

Bulldogs and Chocolate

Is chocolate harmful to your Bulldog? 
The short answer is yes. So does this mean that you should rush your Bullie to vet if he happens to grab a chocolate chip cookie and run off with it? Not necessarily. The problem with chocolate and dogs is the chemical theobromine. In sufficient amounts this chemical is responsible for toxic reactions. It seems this chemical is in the same family as caffeine. So how much is a sufficient amount to cause a toxic reaction? A low estimate is that it takes approximately 100 milligrams of theobromine per 2 pounds of dog body weight to elicit a toxic reaction.

Below are listed the approximate levels of theobromine per ounce for several common chocolate sources:

Milk chocolate has about 40-45 mg of theobromine per ounce
Semi-sweet chocolate contains about 150 mg of theobromine per ounce
Baker’s chocolate has almost 400 mg of theobromine per ounce

Using the above information we can approximate that amount that must be consumed to be a problem:

Milk chocolate: 1 ounce per pound of body weight
Semi-sweet chocolate: 1 ounce for every 3lbs of body weight
Baker’s chocolate: 1 ounce for every 10lbs of body weight

What are the symptoms of chocolate toxicity?

  • Restlessness
  • Increased heart rate
  • Tremors
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Frequent urination
  • Hyper irritability and excitability

What is the treatment?
If you suspect that you Bulldog has consumed a toxic amount of chocolate, call your vet immediately. In some cases, you may wish to induce vomiting within the first several hours. If the consumed chocolate is milk chocolate, diarrhea usually begins within 24 hours. Make sure you keep your Bullie hydrated.

More on Dangerous Dog Foods:
https://baggybulldogs.wordpress.com/2012/07/05/dangerous-dog-food-and-food-tips

Cherry Eye

A cherry eye is also called a third eyelid.

Cause
A cherry eye is not life threatening but can cause irritation and other medical problems such as inflamed nose wrinkles due to excessive teary eyes.
This way it becomes infected and causes injury to the eye.
The cause of cherry eyes is not yet determined with certainty. Some think due to the hereditary predisposition and the degree of folding in the face is a possible cause.

Appearance
If a dog has a cherry eye, you can see a pink lump in the corner of the dog’s eye. The size of the lump differs between 0,5 and 1,5 centimetres.

Treatment

Cherry eye can be treated in two different ways.

First people will first try using ointment massaging the third eyelid into place.
However sometimes this does not work or will only work temporarily. If so it is necessary for medical intervention.

Secondly, there are two ways of corrective surgery for cherry eyes.
The veterinarian can remove the entire third eyelid performing a small medical procedure with a local anesthetic.
The disadvantage of this method and that is that the eyes can dry out quicker causing damage to the cornea.
The other surgical procedure preserves the third eyelid. Here the lid is attached to the inside of the eye with several stitches.
This ensures the probability a shortage of tears does not occur.
The disadvantage of this method is that the dog needs to go undergo general anesthesia which is always a risk.
There is also a chance that the stitches tear making the third eyelid reappear. Repeating the operation is than the only option.

Before starting treatment always consult a veterinarian.

Hotspot

Hotspot
Is also called acute wet dermatitis.
Hot spots are common with dogs with long hair or a thick coat.

Causes 

It is usually caused by an allergic reaction to a specific antigen. Insect bites such as the flea bites are the most common cause found. But even small wounds in the neck caused by playing are mentioned. There are more possible causes of hotspot such as food allergies, mange, ear infections, poor grooming, shrubs or plants thorns, anal gland disorders, stress, hot weather and hormonal responses.
Hotspots are rare in colder months or in winter. They are equally common with dogs who live indoors and those living outside.

Treatment 

Although this is not a long-term disease. When hotspot occurs, the spot can disappear with treatment within a week. The hotspot could occur again that same summer, the next year or disappear completely.

You should treat the growth of the hotspot and address the original cause.
The area must first be cleaned with sterile water. Dab the area carefully and dry with a clean cloth. Keep the spot dry for a quicker result. There are different kinds of powders and ointments to dry out the hotspot. We must also prevent the dogs from traumatising the spot even further. You can give them a ‘lampshade’ or socks on the hind legs to prevent scratching. Sometimes it is handy to tape the big toe nail of the hind leg with tape like Leucoplast.

Many dogs that repeatedly suffer from hotspots could benefit from regular trimming (shaving) of the coat during the summer. Also a bath with special dog shampoo or defleaing your dog. Regularly cleaning their ears and anal glands can also be a method of prevention. 

Appearance

Hotspots are circular spots, mostly on the head, the neck, the hip and on the side of the body. They are wet, raw, inflamed and usually bare and painful. Dogs usually lick or bite at the spot which causes further irritation. This is why hotspot is also called “Pyotraumatic Dermatitis” due to the fact that the trauma itself plays a major role in the development of the disease.


Hotspot can dramatically change in size in a very short period, what was the size of a quarter can become a spot of 10 cm in 6 hours time.
Always have your dog check by a vet before starting treatment.

Bulldog Health and Care

The coat of an English Bulldog requires minimal care. Regular brushing is sufficient. However, the wrinkles/folds of the bulldogs face needs to be monitored regularly. The places where the skin overlaps can get infected. There are special lotions and creams available to treat these kinds of skin infections. There are various methods and remedies for cleaning the skin folds. I use baby wipes for cleaning the wrinkles. And for a more thorough cleaning I use Sudocrem. My experience is that most bulldogs need a weekly brushing and cleaning.

When giving a bulldog their bath it is important that to wash with dog shampoo. Shampoo for humans often contains substances that are harmful for the skin of the dog.


For more information on bathing your Bulldog read the following:
https://baggybulldogs.wordpress.com/2012/06/30/bulldog-bath

The nails of the dog should be regularly monitored. Check to see if the nails are not too long and take extra care of the big toe nail. The nails can be cut with a special cutter for dog nails. Make sure when you do cut their nails you do not cut them too short. If you can’t do it yourself your vet can help with this.


Ensure the ears of the dogs are regularly cleaned. I do this with baby wipes and for a thorough cleaning I use foam lotion. There are several types of medicines and lotions available to clean dog ears at pet stores or at your veterinarian.

Many people confuse fat with muscle and with this thought make their bulldogs unhealthy. When bulldogs are overweight, the load is too heavy for their joints and their heart must work much harder when exercising. This is similar to people with an unhealthy fitness.

The English Bulldog is strongly built and naturally a fit dog. The normal weight of a male is between 25 and 30 kilograms and for a female between 20 and 25 kilograms. If your bulldog is above or below this weight it is not immediately too heavy or too thin. Each bulldog, like every human, is different in terms of construction and bones. If you are unsure about the weight of your dog consult your veterinarian.

The English Bulldog breed has some breed specific health problems. The bulldog is prone to allergies and skin problems. And certain genetic abnormalities occur like shortness of breath, joint problems or cherry eyes. It is important that bulldog breeders take responsibility breeding healthy bulldogs and owners give them the proper medical care when needed.

It is important to mention that the Internet is useful information supply.
Beware: Never act on an internet diagnosis and always consult an expert or veterinarian.